The Myth of the Female Action Hero

Posted by Sanjeev 
Sanjeev (Admin)
Splitting this subtopic off from the Busou Shinki thread because it was getting kinda clusterfucky over there. Which, I guess, is kinda ironic...because THAT thread was split off from the Revoltech thread!

Anyway, I just wanted to make a quick point about MaidenLili's last post about whether sexually-suggestive elements are okay for fantasy-themed toys featuring cute girls with nice bodies. See, I can't front: I like high heels and garters...but only on my lady friends. On cartoon characters, action figures, etc.? Not so much.

I mean, FORGET the whole fucking creepy sociological phenomenon of moe--or even the greater context of sexism--what's wrong with boob-shaped plate armor??? Well, for me, it's simply because that shit's MAD played-out. Good gods, Busou Shinki may be a dope toy line because of the modularity of the parts and whatnot, but the whole fantasy/scifi "cool girl" just makes my head hurt.

I'm not gonna lie: I *loved* Peter Chung's Aeon Flux cartoons for MTV. That shit was fresh...but mainly because it was different (to *my* eyes anyway).

Another example...I started collecting comics a bit before the time Jim Lee started drawing for Uncanny X-Men. When he took over, most every female had the exact same body: D-cup swimsuit model. His artistic range was never particularly impressive. Obviously, Jim Lee wasn't the first to draw female superheroes with such bodies (with their costumes apparently spray-painted on) but I'll admit, it was new to me and I was titillated. I bought in.

But now? C'mon. That style is fucking EVERYWHERE. Comics. Video games. Cartoons. Toys. Even live-action movies now. That style has ZERO aesthetic appeal to me anymore...all that's left is the titillation. It's not-very-good porn. Softcore, unimaginative...and pretty lame. And these days, I'd rather get that sort of titillation in person with a real, live human being next to me...and when *I* want it (not whenever walking past a billboard advertising the latest dragon-slaying-naked-chick video game).

But I'm probably in the minority. 'Cause common-sense thinking doesn't sell comics, video games, cartoons, toys, movies, etc....
Thanks for taking care of the thread split, Sanjeev. It was getting extremely confusing.

I can totally get behind you on the kinda awkwardness and turn-off of having sexual content just 'shoved in your face' from everywhere. That said, I'm not sure I can say what bothers about me is that it is 'played out'.

I'm actually perfectly happy to enjoy erotic content, and it doesn't bother me if the representation is done with animation or otherwise not with live people. I love giant robots whether drawn, CG, or created with gussied up miniatures or animatronics, and in many ways the same is true for sexual media. I mean, for that matter, there is a small but notable amount of actually decent erotic prose and poetry to be had out there, although I usually don't feel like doing the work to dig it up.

I'm more thrown off by the presence of sexual and fetishistic elements when they are 'out of context' - as, often, they feel like they are in superhero works. Is X-Men supposed to be about hot women in skin-tight spandex? Well, maybe it is these days, but last time I was reading it it was supposed to be about the struggles of 'mutants' and the battles of heroic super-powered people against the forces of evil and destruction, or similar. Yes, I know X-Men and other superhero works are insanely more complex than that. I'm just summarizing that it's not, in theory, about sexy girls showing off. By comparison, Bayonetta - regardless of my opinions on the game and character design (the game *was* pretty good, honestly), I appreciate the sexual elements because they are a part of her theme and the personality of her character, and as a result it didn't feel real out of place to have her getting naked despite the violent situations she was usually in.

I take superhero works just as example, because I feel similar about the presence of random sexual elements and titillation in other works as well. If it's not what the work is about, doing it too much just turns me away from the material because it's not what I set out to see in the first place. But if I'm out to view something erotic? Who cares if it's animated or not? If it's good, then I'm getting what I'm looking for. In a similar sense, some toy lines are done for the aesthetic appeal of the person depicted, and that can include cute or sexual elements. I think Busou Shinki fits in here, although parts of the line sure are more about guns and servos than boobs.

Oh, not that I *don't* like real attractive people. On the contrary, I think I'd rather have an IRL sexual encounter with someone I love than view good erotic content, but one does not preclude the other, I think.
Sanjeev Wrote:
>
> I mean, FORGET the whole fucking creepy
> sociological phenomenon of moe--or even the
> greater context of sexism--what's wrong with
> boob-shaped plate armor??? Well, for me, it's
> simply because that shit's MAD played-out.

That's how I feel about the new Catwoman costume. Why is she wearing this tight bodysuit thing? I guess just because she's Catwoman, and that's what Catwoman wears? It just feels so arbitrary - her goggles and utility belt are utilitarian (much like Bane's outfit, aside from his fetish-mask), but the bodysuit doesn't match that aesthetic. The only reason I see for it is to highlight her butt while she's riding that Bat-cycle.


MaidenLili Wrote:
>
> By comparison, Bayonetta -
> regardless of my opinions on the game and
> character design (the game *was* pretty good,
> honestly), I appreciate the sexual elements
> because they are a part of her theme and the
> personality of her character, and as a result it
> didn't feel real out of place to have her getting
> naked despite the violent situations she was
> usually in.

Haha, among video game fans, I think I may be nearly alone in my opinion that Bayonetta is a terrible character design. I object to her on purely aesthetic grounds. I guess I just want her to be more realistically stylish, like a female Beyond The Grave or something, not another lady in skintight black and high heels.



and, I'm pulling these quotes from the old thread:

RainBot Wrote:
>
> One thing that tends to Grind my Gears, as
> mentioned by others previously, is the continuous
> addition of "pop-feminine" traits, like high heels
> (the bane of female figure design) and in Benio's
> case, garters. I honestly didn't notice them at
> first or I might have passed on the figure.

Most shinkis don't have high heels, though. And what do you mean by garters, the little red stripes at the top of Benio's thigh-highs? I don't think that qualifies.


MaidenLili Wrote:
>
> A while ago there was a thread around here
> entitled something like 'Girls and Food',
> featuring an array of pictures ranging from
> (sometimes rather cute) pictures of women eating,
> to women in various states of undress and
> suggestiveness with some kind of edible material
> on/in/near their bodies. If anything, I found the
> content of that thread more awkward and creepy
> than fetishization in fantasy characters, although
> I think I'll need to think more and make a second
> post to coherently formulate exactly why that is.

I think I started that thread (as well as a later one about girls with marine life), and I feel like I should apologize for how insanely creepy it is from an outside point of view. It was intended as humorous (and indeed I still find a lot of those pictures hilarious), as a response to the "Sex with Saint Seiya" thread, which was about photographs of naked girls with toys (and was not started by me, though I did post a number of related images that I happened upon). Anyway, I feel that, despite the overwhelmingly male readership of this board, we are not one of those places where guys just post photos of hot chicks and give each other internet high-fives over it. I think the majority of us took those threads as the sort of tongue-in-cheek "look how weird this is" exchange that I always thought of them as. Certainly I don't think that most of those pictures are genuinely sexy by any reasonable measure (regardless of how attractive the women in them were). I mean, the greater theme here, to me, is not that we should be looking at girls holding or interacting with food, but that you can construct almost any phrase like "girls with ______" and find hundreds of intended-to-be-sexy photos (with varying degrees of success) matching that theme on the internet. This phenomenon never ceases to entertain me.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
Sanjeev (Admin)
I don't mind multi-media "erotic content", but I like to keep my smut separate from my mainstream hobbies and whatnot. Like, if I wanna get turned on (rrrowr!), I want it to be on my terms...not capitalist America's. When I'm playing with toys, reading comics, watching scifi, etc., I want to be genuinely entertained by those things because they're solidly enjoyable for their intrinsic value as what they are (not because there's a persistent Freudian poke to my inner wang). But again, that's just me.

See, I agree with you about X-Men--I just think that sexual stuff is *usually* out of context. Yup, X-Men is an allegory about racism...so why am I so distracted by Storm's booty? If I'm watching a video from the latest pop star trollop on MTV, then sure, bring on the skin. But that's in-context. Action figures? Eh.....not so much. But I suppose that reaction is based on the more common "girlie figures" with their "cast-off" clothing. For Busou Shinki, in particular, I tend to agree: they seem to be more about guns and servos than boobs. It's just that--again, for *me*--the "cool girl"-ness of the base BS figures is somewhat lame (at least for most of the BS figures I've seen) because I think that particular style is played out.

Oh, and that "women laughing with salad" blog post someone linked in the girls with food thread was fucking GENIUS.
Sanjeev Wrote:
>
> Oh, and that "women laughing with salad" blog post
> someone linked in the girls with food thread was
> fucking GENIUS.

That was about stock photography, right? I think I also saw a great post recently about the ridiculous behavior of women in yogurt advertisements.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
Sanjeev (Admin)
Yeah, all advertisement stuff, I think. Truly great. Or...disturbing as hell. Whichever you like.
Well, the difference between stock photo and photography actually used in advertisements, from a "so bad it's good" POV, is that you can find stock photos that are way, way beyond the limits of what anyone would ever use in any publication. I think it's probably a consequence of the massive amount of photos one has to shoot and put out there to make any kind of money off stock...

Man, I wanted to bring this back on topic by finding some of the outrageously, unnecessarily pseudo-sexy stock photos I occasionally run across at work, but I can't put my finger on one right now.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
You dopes. It's no myth. There really are female action heroes! Of course I'm gonna tie this comment back to 4x4 and motocross stuff, cuz these are some ladies that rock! Motors! MonsterTrucks!! Dirtbikes! Rrawwr!
[www.johnson4x4.com]


[staugustine.com]
[www.youtube.com]

Oh, and we can't forget Jody Boatwood (she shows up about 1:12 point) There's sorta-kaiju in this one I swear!
[www.youtube.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/09/2011 12:38AM by repairtechjon.
asterphage Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Well, the difference between stock photo and
> photography actually used in advertisements, from
> a "so bad it's good" POV, is that you can find
> stock photos that are way, way beyond the limits
> of what anyone would ever use in any publication.
> I think it's probably a consequence of the massive
> amount of photos one has to shoot and put out
> there to make any kind of money off stock...
>
> Man, I wanted to bring this back on topic by
> finding some of the outrageously, unnecessarily
> pseudo-sexy stock photos I occasionally run across
> at work, but I can't put my finger on one right
> now.

A few months ago there was an ad-campaign for business suits here in the Netherlands that showed a good looking guy in a suit looking up a woman's skirt/have her in typical porn poses and being generally mysognistic (I'll see if I can find some pictures later). The campaign got a whole lot of complaints, which were all dismissed by the governmental authority on advertisements (because they 'were not offending', IIRC).

Personally, I would really have wanted a parody ad campaign with the positions inversed (guy in suit in humiliating poses being used as a sex toy by a sharp-dressed woman) with billboards everywhere, just for the (male) outrage that would have followed...thus showing hypocrisy.

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net
Sanjeev (Admin)
"Were not offending", huh? Well, a stupid ad campaign is probably not responsible for any actual human fatalities, but that attitude is highly distressing. Because sexism DOES actually kill women everyday. If a woman were able to "hear" an average guy's thoughts throughout a typical day (myself included), she'd likely be pretty horrified by the level of casual dehumanization that occurs--whether we (men) realize it or not. That's the nature of oppression...and most folks just don't fucking get it. Wrapping it up in a supposedly charming or funny ad campaign doesn't solve anything.

Anyway, Jon, it's good that you bring up women in motorsports. Hell, despite not having our own WNBA team, women's basketball at the school level is big in Massachusetts (unfortunately, because we're such a HUGE pro-sports market, there's relatively little support for college sports, MLS, etc). Still pisses me off that their ball is smaller though...

But I think the point of this discussion is more about the "cool girl" trope in (male-oriented) fantasy pop culture...not sports. Some people seem to think that these supposedly strong female images are somehow a healthy thing. Yes, it's nice to have female characters as protagonists in action or scifi stories...but Scarlett Johansson's character in Iron Man 2 hardly advanced the cause of ending sexism or the oppression of women.
My interpretation of this thread.

--------------------------------------------------------------

I asked if I have "Time For L-Gaim" but I got "No Reply From The Wind".
Attachments:
open | download - No_fun-(n1309495986848).jpg (70.5 KB)
you're supposed to use the Scopedog one
Found the pics of said ad campaign:

[www.bndestem.nl]

The reaction of the sales guy who gets quoted in the article is also telling, as he can't understand why some people, especially women, could be offended by the pictures. Idiot.

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net
Doesn't Europe have a way more lax view on sex in the media in general?

--------------------------------------------------------------

I asked if I have "Time For L-Gaim" but I got "No Reply From The Wind".
Vincent Z. Wrote:
> My interpretation of this thread.
> [toyboxdx.com]

Didn't you ASK for this thread to be split off from the Busou Shinki thread? Shouldn't that make it perfectly easy to ignore if you don't like it?


thomas Wrote:
> Found the pics of said ad campaign:
>
> [www.bndestem.nl]

WARNING TO OTHERS: the second and third images in that article are NOT WORK SAFE.

Wow, I had two simultaneous and contradictory reactions to that. I was thinking that it's actually a fairly good photo, the clothes and location are nice, it's well-shot and dynamic... then the image really hit me and I practically burst out laughing at how absurd it is. I'm trying hard to imagine the type of person who would think this was cool.

Oh my god their website is even worse (ALSO NOT WORK SAFE):







That third photo is pretty much entirely awful.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
asterphage Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> thomas Wrote:
> > Found the pics of said ad campaign:
> >
> >
> [www.bndestem.nl]
> campagne-SuitSupply-zorgt-voor-reacties.ece
>
> WARNING TO OTHERS: the second and third images in
> that article are NOT WORK SAFE.
>
> Wow, I had two simultaneous and contradictory
> reactions to that. I was thinking that it's
> actually a fairly good photo, the clothes and
> location are nice, it's well-shot and dynamic...
> then the image really hit me and I practically
> burst out laughing at how absurd it is. I'm trying
> hard to imagine the type of person who would think
> this was cool.
>
> Oh my god their website is even worse (ALSO NOT
> WORK SAFE):
>
> [www.suitsupply.com]
> unds/ablauwedas.jpg
>
> [www.suitsupply.com]
> unds/brug.jpg
>
> [www.suitsupply.com]
> unds/etribeass.jpg
>
> That third photo is pretty much entirely awful.

Now imagine these images hanging from large billboards along the road in a completely normal, non-seedy, residential neighbourhood. O_o

But yeah, if anything, those images likely convinced a lot of people not to ever buy one of their suits.
BTW, the guy quoted in the article also brought up the quality of the images.

Edit: Just noticed the file names of the images: 'blue tie', 'bridge', and 'tribal ass'. The contrast between the first two and the third is amazing.


@Vince: Yes, but there's a difference between 'possibly suggestive' and 'goddamn explicit'. These ads are worse than the porn ads found along certain motorways.

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/10/2011 02:38AM by thomas.
Sanjeev (Admin)
"Tribal...ass".

Incredible.
Sanjeev Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "Tribal...ass".
>
> Incredible.

Yeah, so's the damn suit, tie, and shirt. The ass is the best part by far.

More serious than thou
Is the capitalistic/non-humor intent of the ads what condemns them compared to the "___ with food" thread which is somehow exempted by having humorous intent? Does the casual viewer always have access to the intent? Do the ads have humorous intent after all that is being dismissed or overpowered by offense somehow? Are realistic intimate postures the culprit rather than states of dress? Then why do fragrance print ads get away with it? Is it the imbalance of power represented by armored vs. unarmored? Does the bee have the right to say to the flower "look how she's ornamented, she was ASKING to be pollinated!" Isn't ornamentation (a sharp suit with a nice tie) always either advertisement ("check me out") or obeisance ("yes, your Honor")?

Okay, I think some of my own questions can be answered by simply remarking that ads are in the commons. That makes a huge difference for sure.

Re: Catwoman. Oh, if Nolan had gone against type and ditched the pleather! Could have been amazing and landmark - even redefining. Guess he'll have to settle for endless accolades. Plus Hot Toys' molds are already tooled (joke). There's still hope, though. A female actors' entire performance judged by a leaked production photo? I'm sure no one on the internet would do THAT.

------------------------------------------------------------------
I am seeking a plastic Popy Tora Sobu Raideen.
Sanjeev (Admin)
Well, the intent of an ad is to convince me that something is deficient about me, and that I can rectify this thing buy purchasing their goods or services. Regardless of whether ad, itself, is funny or not. That fundamental capitalist nature isn't very funny...so ads featuring potentially offensive material are naturally going to attract critical scrutiny.

The girls with food thread was mildly humorous to me because it was a satire (or is that parody??? :P ) of the other fetishization of women we see in this hobby. And in satirizing that fetishization (whose intent is obviously to sell toys, video games, cartoons, etc.), the intent was inherently anti-capitalist. At least, that's how I read it (and Paul confirmed explicitly above).
Some interesting posts from curmudgeonly otaku-culture commentator Daryl Surat here, in a SomethingAwful thread about video games, on why it's so hard to incite reform against fanboys' love of female characters who are widely perceived as sexist portrayals:
[forums.somethingawful.com]
He doesn't seem to have any suggestions on how to improve the state of affairs, but he makes some valuable points - particularly about how shaming and chastising fanboys won't change their minds, it'll just get them mad at you, or, in the best case, get them to go away. His posts devolve into "no one seems to agree about anything, so how can we even draw any conclusions?" later in the thread, though.

This is also relevant to the various creepy otaku threads, but it seems closest to the subject matter of this thread.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
I'm good with "go away". :>

-Ginrai
Golden Gate Riot on dead trees at: [www.destroyallcomics.com]
Ginrai Wrote:
> I'm good with "go away". :>

Well, yeah, but his point is directed at people who want to see the portrayals of female characters in niche media improve. You may be satisfied just ignoring the juvenile crap that video game and comic book creators produce, but if people are taking it upon themselves to argue against the type of vacuous sexist depictions common in fanboy-targeted fiction, they should at least approach it from an angle that might do some good. If we chase the fanboys off when we're trying to edify them, they'll just go occupy their niche and content producers will keep catering to it.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
I have nothing clever to say.

--------------------------------------------------------------

I asked if I have "Time For L-Gaim" but I got "No Reply From The Wind".



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/11/2011 05:22PM by Vincent Z..
[www.flickr.com] strong female character!
[www.doctornerdlove.com]
For something written as relationship advice for hopeless nerds, this is fascinating. It also takes a direction that serves as something of a counterpoint to Surat's criticisms earlier - it is a direct, open appeal to persuade said nerds to recognize the flaws in how geek-targeted media depicts women, and how this has shaped and damaged many geeks' (and presumably his intended readers') perceptions of women. There are other interesting posts on that site about what hopeless nerds need to do to correct their skewed perceptions of women (perhaps more of interest to the Worst Otaku thread), but this is interesting in how it addresses the actual flaws of the media geeks love (which are so ineffectually criticized by the "bingo cards" and gimmicks and jokes that Surat decries in his posts). Though somewhat frustratingly, presumably because he breaks up content to keep his blog posts regularly scheduled, many key points he makes are found in the other articles he links to throughout this post.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/13/2011 07:33PM by asterphage.
I'm starting to think Paul needs a TBDX contributor of the year award. You're doing very well in keeping these threads alive and interesting.
[www.cracked.com]

Lemme get my barf bag. Shit like this made turn away from American comics to Japanese stuff.

--------------------------------------------------------------

I asked if I have "Time For L-Gaim" but I got "No Reply From The Wind".
Touhou has the best outfits




STRONGEST FEMALE CHARACTER


touhou hijack lol



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/01/2012 03:12PM by VF5SS.
When I saw this thread bumped I was hoping I would find a nice little debate about Haywire, Steven Soderbergh's apparent attempt to redefine the Hollywood female hero.
(I enjoyed the movie, but I don't think he succeeded at his revolutionary aims.)

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
Seems the main complaint with Haywire is just that it's the same ol' same ol' action. There's a girl in there? Oh, well.
Well, it's not the SAME old action. The star is a MMA fighter, and the fights are very realistically staged and choreographed. They're shot in a very clear way, with none of the fast-paced, distracting editing of the modern action movie. There's NO score in the fights, just realistic sound.

The problem is that Soderbergh, in service of this stripped-down style, eschews anything that would excite the audience or intensify their reaction. The fights are clear, they're competently shot, but the cinematography and editing don't work to attenuate the suspense - any reaction the viewer gets is from the action on screen itself. One might think that the use of only natural sound and realistic pacing would make the fights feel more brutal, but Soderbergh doesn't even intensify that aspect - he keeps the fights themselves fairly theatrical, with only the most momentary sense that the characters are hurting each other before they rebound and retaliate.

In a word, I'd describe the action as "technical". It's a bloodless (figuratively and literally!) approach. Soderbergh may be telling us that he thinks this is how action on film should look and feel, but his philosophy discards what his audience wants. I liked the movie well enough - I think that mainstream action directors could take some lessons from it - but it's very, very far removed from the genre it's trying to take part in.

More to the point of this thread, I saw a lot of chatter when the movie was released, from both critics and random folks on the internet, about how Gina Carano doesn't look like the typical female action star. I don't really see what they're referring to. Her background is different from the typical actress, but on screen, she's still clearly been through hair and makeup, eyebrows perfectly shaped, made to look as smooth and flawless as everyone in Hollywood. By the end of the movie, she's even gotten into a fight while wearing an evening gown.

There's little attempt made to visually portray her in a way that distinguishes the character from the average Hollywood lead. The terse dialogue, written with consciousness of her inexperience as an actor, has a much greater effect on the character portrayal than anything about her appearance. On that note, I found that Carano was good in the role, never distracting or out of place. She's not about to blow anyone away with her performance, but she makes the spy-talk believable, and her scenes with Bill Paxton, as her character's father, really stood out.

Final note: This movie is perfect for anyone who's always wanted to see Michael Fassbender or Ewan McGregor get choked out.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
Veef kind of has a point, if a bit of a digression. No, really!

Touhou Project titles have been coming out from Zun regularly since 1996 (hey, that's pretty much pre "moe~", too!), and have all featured very strong female protagonists and antagonists, and derivative works aside, not particularly fetishized in the original context (other than the obvious fact it is 99.5% female characters, many of which are anthropomorphized versions of various gods and youkai, of course).

And note that while Touhou derivative works dominate Comiket in sheer numbers, that number is almost perfectly evenly split between erotica and non erotica, which is among the highest ratio of non-ero for any series represented there, let alone that if the two kinds were seperate series, they would still likely top the chart in numbers.

Of course every series has its more questionable fandom and fan-works too. Japan is where rule 34 of the internet was practically invented. But many people actually enjoy writing/drawing and reading stories (let alone spin-off games, music, etc.) about these characters without the need to make them into objects, and have been doing so for sixteen years.

That all said, I'm not sure I'd call Touhou characters "action heroes" outside the original context of the games, either. Danmaku battles are pretty serious, Itano Circus-level barrages of death and destruction, but the dodging looks pretty casual in-game, and combat in the fan works can vary anywhere from some cool wuxia-like moves to replacing the whole thing with a mahjong game, Age of Empires, or whatever, lolwut.
ty

Meiling is the best because she convinces cosplayers to pretend they know kung fu

and show some leg obviously

[danbooru.donmai.us]

(lawl j-list NSFW ads)
Sanjeev (Admin)
I *was* gonna post this in the Kickstarter Flimflam thread...but it kinda has little to do with Kickstarter, in and of itself...and more to do with the idea of Female Action Heroes:
[www.kickstarter.com]

I've had the pleasure of corresponding with the women running this campaign...and they're legit.
As Fry would say... "Shut up and take my money"!

This is super cool... and very sharp looking action figures! I'm passing this on to my friends/co-workers who have little girls....
Sanjeev (Admin)
Yup. And after speaking with the people running the project, they're definitely planning to branch out the ethnicities of their bucks. This was the main (only?) criticism I've heard about the initial wave so far from folks. It isn't quite explicit in their marketing, but the buck for *just* this initial wave is based on Joan of Arc (hence the figures all being "coded" white).

Each new wave, however, will be based on a buck modeled after other famous women (of all races and ages) throughout history. And within each wave, each figure will still represent a different super power. They're going to stick to using wild colors for the figures' "skin" and sculpt hair covering more diverse textures and styles from other cultures. Having each wave produced like this will obviously make the overall line more universally inclusive, while also avoiding pinning any one ethnicity as having any one particular power/characteristic or another.
I have a criticism. That is still a super idealized female body that almost no real woman has...

-Ginrai
Golden Gate Riot on dead trees at: [www.destroyallcomics.com]
Sanjeev (Admin)
Really?

They're certainly slim figures, but it's not like their waists are tiny, while having huge tits and asses.


It make not be SEXUALIZED but it's highly IDEALIZED.

-Ginrai
Golden Gate Riot on dead trees at: [www.destroyallcomics.com]
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