Major Quake

Posted by MattAlt 
Now comes the fight for survival. The supermarkets are all running out of food. The conbinis look like RUssian supermarkets. The problem in TOkyo is that all the food is brought in from other parts of the country. Once the local stock runs out, the city is screwed unless they can open up lines of distribution. The highways are all closed as of now and the trains are running, but the shink is not running north. Fortunately the airports in TOkyo are OK, so imports should not be a problem, but the locals are preparing for the worst it seems. I don't know about other parts of Tokyo, but Minato-ku is definitely running out of food.
On top of the quake and the tsunami, a possible meltdown is reported in one nuclear power plant in Fukushima after the cooling systems failed, and a second power plant nearby is also overheating due to failed cooling systems. The first plant has also suffered an explosion that blew the outer walls and roof off a building - it's not clear whether it's the actual reactor building or not. :(

The damage from the quake and floods can be cleaned up, but if those power plants have a more catastrophic failure than they currently seem to have part of Japan may become inhabitable for some time. What worries me is that the officials seem to be downplaying the damage at the plant and suggest they are in control, while the unexpected explosion proves they are not - so the situation could be worse than reported. :(

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net
Yeah, that meltdown has me worried, it sounds like it could be an awful situation in the making. M1GO is in that prefecture but they're about 45 miles (70 km) from the power plant.

Eiji from Marusan checked in, he said all of his employees are okay.

Also, the Gundam photo was a hoax:

[gizmodo.com]

I also have Matt's Twitter feed (@Matt_Alt) going to my phone now, he's doing an excellent job of conveying what it's like in his section of Tokyo, I can really visualize it.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/12/2011 09:24AM by Roger.
It seems that the nuclear reactor thing is being a little - dare I say it? - overblown:

[atomicinsights.blogspot.com]

The short version is: by and large, nuclear containment vessels (as opposed to the *buildings* they might be in) are designed to be pretty damn tough.
F-ZeroOne Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> It seems that the nuclear reactor thing is being a
> little - dare I say it? - overblown:
>
> [atomicinsights.blogspot.com]
> -plant-issues-in-japan-are-least.html
>
> The short version is: by and large, nuclear
> containment vessels (as opposed to the *buildings*
> they might be in) are designed to be pretty damn
> tough.

Thanks for this. It's nice to read some rational information as opposed to fear mongering and sensationalism.
I love it how people keep comparing these reactors to 3 Mile Island or for the love of glub, Chernobyl... two power stations that were far more primitive and inferior in their design.
Sanjeev (Admin)
Yeah, Matt and I were discussing this a little bit over e-mail...see, the problem being a nookyooler engineer is that when shit happens like this, we're still at the whim of the media, like everyone else. It's just that we can easily spot the gross technical inaccuracies in basically every write-up.

But I'm not there...so I even if I can spot bullshit, I can't say for certain what's *really* going on. All I can say is that I'm VERY familiar with the light water reactor designs employed by most Japanese utilities, and I know their primary containment structures are designed to take direct fucking missile strikes. I realize that almost 9 on the richter scale is pretty damn significant, but I know how over-engineered these things are, with multi-multi-redundant systems. For the designers NOT to have planned for earthquakes and tsunami (even of THIS magnitude)--and when they HAVE planned for enemy military strikes--is simply ludicrous.
Good rational comments on the reactor part of the story. Not my field, but have heard from friends/old co-workers in the biz (aside from our own 'Jeev here) complaining of the poor comparisons.

Scary, serious stuff can ,and is happening, but will wait for more good info. Will be slow in coming, but nowhere NEAR like even just 10 years ago. Amazing how much on-ground experiences can be transmitted, for better or worse.
Seems like there was a leak of some sort. Tokyo is going into rollout power outages starting Monday. This sucks as I can't get any real work done then.
cohiba, how did your own place fare? Shelves, artwork, toys, glass, tile, etc.?
You mentioned food supply before. How's that going today?
Distribution channels are questionable. Dry goods and canned food are definitely in limited supply. I think that the stores still have local stock so the shortages for the time being are infrequent. Where I am, about 75% of the restaurants are still open, but a lot of places are shutting early. The fact that some places are closed is telling of the lack of food getting around. I think the small mom and pop shops are going to run out of ingredients quickly, or have run out already. The bigger restaurants have their personal stock and access to better distribution are going to be better off. The airports and trains are still running so the city is not completely cut off. It is scary to see unstocked shelves though in a city as big as Tokyo.

My apartment was OK. A bunch of toys fell off the shelves, no artwork fell off the walls, some books also fell, but as a whole it was OK. No wine broke, no glasses broke so it was generally OK.
I'd don't subscribe to any Twitter,but here's Matt's updates:
[twitter.com]#

Been interesting to follow. Planned rolling blackouts in 3hr. shifts to deal with power strain on system.
I'm glad everyhting is fine for you guys...
take care !
Y.
"The Department of State requests all non-essential official U.S. government personnel defer travel to Japan and also urges U.S. citizens to avoid tourism and non-essential travel to Japan at this time. "

[travel.state.gov]
Possibly the best description yet of why we should not all be reaching for the RadAway just yet:

[morgsatlarge.wordpress.com]
My sources told me that Goldman Sachs had a top level meeting with the State Department and MI6 to discuss whether top officers of the firm needed to evacuate the country- bottom line- they are staying in town.

I figure if any group is going to have effective risk controls it is GS. So I wouldn't worry just yet about nuclear fallout.
cohiba Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> I figure if any group is going to have effective
> risk controls it is GS.

Except, apparently, in those fields where they are supposed to be specialized in, if you think about the main causes for the recent financial crisis...

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net
Sanjeev (Admin)
F-ZeroOne Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Possibly the best description yet of why we should
> not all be reaching for the RadAway just yet:
>
> [morgsatlarge.wordpress.com]
> -am-not-worried-about-japans-nuclear-reactors/


What? My word wasn't good enough for you??? Snob.

;)

Seriously...everyone should read that...then y'all will know how pissed off I am about the media's coverage of this event. It sure seems like communicating truth is no longer relevant in our society. People will lie, blatantly, to further their political ends...or to gain ad revenue. Meanwhile REAL people are REALLY dying for REAL reasons. This selfishness dishonors them.
On the other hand, I really wish governments would stop releasing press statements stating that things are under control when obviously they are not (based on the course of events). Sometimes it's better to say "We don't know", instead of "Everything is under control and safe" and to later have to retract that when it appears things are detoriating or major polution has happened.

e.g. (from Wikipedia, sources include the Tokyo Electrical Company):
Quote

On 14 March 2011, the reactor building for Unit 3 exploded as well.[10][11] TEPCO says that 6 people were injured in the blast.[12]

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net
MattAlt (Admin)
I'm not sure the explosion is indicative of things being out of control. This was expected from an unavoidable build-up of offgassed hydrogen, and while several workers were unfortunately injured, that is a testament to their heroism and not the situation being out of control. It's very easy to get over-excited when relying on foreign news reports, which tend to exaggerate and emphasize the most negative aspects of situations like this. The Japanese are taking a very measured, calm, and science-based approach to dealing with the reactors and while I am obviously nervous about them, I feel like the situation is being dealt with as well as it could be.
thomas- that is what the layman might think, but GS came out unscathed for the most part. They might have been partly responsible for the crisis, but thy are in a better position now than ever before. I think they weathered that crisis brilliantly. They made more money after the crisis than before. I know these guys well, so let me tell you, they weathered the financial crisis fine. YOu think that bailing out AIG was to help AIG? No, AIG's biggest counterparty was Goldman, it was engineered to help Goldman Sachs out. So your comment is unfortunately incorrect.

Except, apparently, in those fields where they are supposed to be specialized in, if you think about the main causes for the recent financial crisis...

The problem with the nuclear facility potential meltdown is that the government cannot in any responsible way say that there is s major problem going on and that fallout is unavoidable. This will cause more panic and more potential death and destruction than slowly leaking out information. The stream of information flowing out from the government is steadily worse (managing expectations). First there was no fear of meltdown. Now there is potential for meltdown, and the news started talking about potential fallout measures (simple ones, but once again managing expectations).

given the situation, cooling the reactors with seawater is the last measure because saltwater will corrode the reactor and make in unusable. The hydrogen gas venting is also unavoidable, but it does release some radiation into the atmosphere. I guess any man-made radiation being introduced to the environment can be considered contamination, but it is still at a level that is the same as 3-4 chest X-rays. you will probably get more radiation from the TSA full body scans. I agree the Japanese are approaching it from a calm and scientific manner, I think it was odd that they went straight to the seawater solution, which is usually a last ditch effort. That would indicate that the problem might be more severe than is televised. While focusing on the nuclear meltdown issue is a primary concern for those of us in Tokyo, we must not forget that the situation in Sendai is pretty horrible to begin with and is not getting any better with time.
I really appreciate the level heads here at TBDX. Broadcasting Josef Oehmen's link liberally, which is helping to cool some fears to friends here and in Japan.
Also promoting your twitter Matt, great great work...thinking about you all, A LOT.
Sanjeev (Admin)
My thesis partner from college and I got together this weekend to pool the "facts" and come up with our own theory of what probably happened. Unlike myself, he stuck with the nuke field and now works at the Pilgrim nuclear power plant in Plymouth, MA as a reactor engineer. Why'd we do this? Rage at all the know-it-alls? Desire to promote truth, rather than an agenda or our own greed? Boredom? Most likely the latter. And remember, this is just our theory...

Well, Fukushima Daiichi consists of 6 boiling water reactors (BWR)--similar to what my buddy works with at Pilgrim. That is 6 reactors, 6 buildings, 6 turbines all independent of one another. I guess at the outset of the earthquake, 3 of the 6 units were already shut off for scheduled maintenance. These reactors suffered no damage.

The thing about these GE-designed BWRs is that besides their multi-multi-redundant safety systems, they also have numerous layers to prevent radioactive material from hitting the environment (like y'all hopefully read about in fel9's link). So, again, you first have the zircalloy cladding coating the fuel pellets in the core. Secondary is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), which surrounds the core. Then, you got the primary containment called the "drywell", which surrounds the RPV. Finally, the drywell sits inside the last barrier, the secondary containment building. That's the thing blowing up all over the news. The drywell's fine.

The three units running at rated power at the start of the earthquake all automatically scrammed: in other words, the control rods were automatically inserted to stop the fission reaction inside the core. Again, scramming suppresses further fission reactions, but does not relieve the core of its decay heat and latent heat. So the heat from natural radioactive decay processes continued to supply heat that needed to be dumped. This decay heat production diminishes naturally with time at an exponential rate.

At the same time, there was probably a complete loss of offsite power (LOOP) incident because the earthquake probably disrupted local power supplies, transformers, etc. As designed, each unit's emergency diesel generators (EDGs) kicked on to supply power to the various safety-related cooling water pumps. During these types of events, the EDGs supply all of the juice the plant needs to run the various crap in the plant to ensure water is pumped into the core, thus preventing the decay heat from boiling all the water off. But here's the problem: these types of plants are designed to withstand 6.5 meters water in flood conditions. So, like, everything is elevated or protected via barriers or whatever so that if 6.5 meters of water enters the plant, it will continue to operate as designed. Well, the fucking tsunami brought in 7+ meters of water. As a result, the EDGs fuel oil tanks were flooded at all three of the units simultaneously, on top of the LOOP! The valve alignment batteries kicked in at this point to supply the pumps...but batteries eventually run out, of course...

The mechanisms that supply water to the core are the high and low pressure coolant injection (HPCI and LPCI, respectively) systems. The HPCI system was probably not used, so the entire unit was depressurized to use LPCI. This was probably the primary means of injecting water into the core to keep it covered and keep it from melting down, however when the battery power ran out, LPCI likely failed and uncovered part of the reactor core (i.e., the water level boiled down to about half way below the top of active fuel).

When you uncover the core of a nuclear reactor, things get shitty. The temperature rises fast, because the ambient steam doesn't cool for crap. At around 2200 degrees or whatever, the zircalloy cladding that surrounds the fuel rods starts to interact with the steam to generate hydrogen (this is called a "zirc-water reaction"). This chemical (not nuclear) reaction is highly exothermic and can runaway quickly, resulting in high levels of hydrogen in the RPV. This hydrogen makes it's way into the drywell, increases in pressure, and at the right concentration, can go kablooey. Throughout this whole time, the drywell is hermetically sealed, though, to keep radioactive matter from leaking out. Decay heat continues to be removed via the residual heat removal (RHR) heat exchangers, but because the drywell pressure is rising--along with the potential for a hydrogen explosion--you have to vent the drywell periodically to the secondary containment building. It is this venting that supplied hydrogen to the building and which detonated. The important thing to realize is that drywell and the RPV are very likely perfectly intact, and continue to restrain any radioactivity leakage.

So then, the plant engineers decided to insert seawater into the RPV to maintain core coverage until the decay heat was low enough that water would no longer boil. This has to be done for a couple of days. At that point, there won't be any worry about damage to the fuel cladding (i.e., the dreaded "core meltdown" everyone fears, yet knows nearly nothing about). Salt water is corrosive as hell though, so these reactors are permanently fucked. The other units could likely start up as soon as the grid is restored, but that probably won't happen until aftershocks have subsided and additional tsunami barriers are erected to prevent this situation from happening again. Or until anti-nuke protesters shut up.

Anyway, while this obviously sucks from a plant operations perspective, this is hardly a "catastrophic" event. The site experienced an event that is far beyond it's mandated design parameters, and the measures taken so far have been highly effective. Radiation levels outside the plant are low...and while thousands of lives have been lost to one of the biggest natural disasters in history, none of those deaths should be attributable to sickness caused by radioactive material released into the environment from these plants. If anything, this should be a testament to the effectiveness of these plants' safe operation.
thomas Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> On the other hand, I really wish governments would
> stop releasing press statements stating that
> things are under control when obviously they are
> not (based on the course of events). Sometimes
> it's better to say "We don't know", instead of
> "Everything is under control and safe" and to
> later have to retract that when it appears things
> are detoriating or major polution has happened.

The only trouble there is that, in my public service experience, saying "I don't know" immediately provokes the reaction of the person you;re saying it to wanting to know what you've just told them you don't know... :-)
Potassium Iodine is flying off the shelves here in Cali, people are terrified of the radioactive cloud headed our way. There really is very little good info available right now, and a whole hell of a lot of screaming ninnies.
Mike Parisi Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Potassium Iodine is flying off the shelves here in
> Cali, people are terrified of the radioactive
> cloud headed our way. There really is very little
> good info available right now, and a whole hell of
> a lot of screaming ninnies.


This disappoints me hugely. Doesn't anyone take the time to learn and understand things these days?

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Sanjeev, any thoughts on thorium as a viable alternative to uranium? I've heard the reason why we don't go there is thorium can't be weaponized. Stupid choice if it truly is safer.
Sanjeev (Admin)
I don't know for certain because the way we learned was more like "this is how it works..." than "here's the basic principle; can you think of anything better?"

I'm sure there's a real simple reason for uranium over thorium...even if it's just as simple as we can squeeze more juice out of uranium per dollar invested in mining for it.

But if you think about it, even if thorium couldn't be weaponized, how would that help? That wouldn't stop my--er, I mean--Iran's uranium enrichment (weaponizing) programs...
Designers playing nuclear scientists...the scourge of all humanity!

[www.dailytech.com]
Sanjeev (Admin)
Asinine.

Amazing how ego trumps all common sense. If someone actually wanted to help create a better tomorrow, they'd likely be better off *joining*, or at least donating to, one of the many real organizations doing this work for the good of the world.

But what do I know..?

A web designer, alone, starting from scratch--while decades of international collaborative research continues to churn--certainly has a chance. Remember cold fusion? Oh, wait...yes, I do...

Anyway, first of all, nuclear fusion releases neutrons, and is thus HIGHLY dangerous 1) on its own *and* 2) as a source that can activate surrounding matter (making everything around it radioactive). I'm SURE that's fucking legal in a Brooklyn apartment. Oh, and deuterium and tritium (hydrogen isotopes) fuels are highly, highly toxic. Good luck, asshole!

I guess it's easier to "play scientist" than it is to go out and talk to people and actually learn something.
Asshole extraordinaire Tokyo Governor Ishihara said the earthquake was divine punishment.

[www.animenewsnetwork.com]
What is this, NuclearReactorsDX.com?

Seriously, though, thanks to Mr. Jeev and others for the info--very educational.

Speaking of educational, got this over the staff listserv today:

[latimesblogs.latimes.com]

It's...still not quite sure how to articulate how I feel about this (click on the video link to hear it from the horse's mouth, so to speak). I mean, it's so blatantly racist it's stereotypical movie Southerner racist. I could buy that it's tongue-in-cheek were it not for the fact that, well, it's not.

Glad to see that she at least threw a shout-out to the tsunami victims. And glad to see my alma mater represented so well.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/14/2011 09:24PM by gingaio.
Thanks for the information, all. Anyway, after yesterday's idiotic typos and mass-panicking I'm going to take all local media with a grain of salt:

Examples of nonsense in newspapers:
- This was the greatest quake in either 14 or 7 years in Japan (actually: greatest quake since the measurements started 140 years ago, ranking 7th on list of greatest quakes worldwide)
- The whole crew of the USS Ronald Reagan was irradiated (actually: some helicopters and their crew, lightly)
- A disaster worse than Chernobyl looms in Japan (this from a reputable newspaper - for fuck's sake, do some research!)
- The Netherlands would be totally devastated by a tsunami (A. we're shielded by the UK and part of Scandinavia, B. the North Sea is such a large flat and shallow body of water that it would likely dampen the tsunami)
- The Netherlands is at risk of 9.0 Magnitude quakes (despite no fault line being nearby and the only major quakes having been causes by gas fields being emptied).

Me thinks a lot of 'journalists' need to get back to school, and get some reading comprehension and critical research lessons. For tonight I fully expect them to take Ishihara's lunatic rant and blame manga/whatever for the quake.

Coming back to the quake (and away from power plants), some of the aerial photographs make me think of Hiroshima (but with water) :( . When I see the pictures I am genuinely surprised quite many people seem to have survived that, either by outrunning the wave or by going into shelters (on which information is crudely missing in the media).

--
SilhouetteFormula.Net



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/15/2011 09:26AM by thomas.
MattAlt (Admin)
I did my best to summarize the current situation here:

[altjapan.typepad.com]

(For those who are interested in following the situation from a just-the-facts-as-we-know-them perspective. This is based on Japanese official press conferences and public online geiger datafeeds from around Tokyo. It of course assumes that we aren't being fed a phony line from the powers that be, but I have some inside sources at Japanese news organizations that say they feel this is being reported as it's happening without cover-up or spin. Take it for what it's worth... It's been a tense few days for Tokyoites.)
Thanks Matt for posting solid numbers to the crisis. It is hard to get actual numbers form Japanese news broadcasts. I have been trying to tell the chickie that it is still at levels that we don"t have to worry about.

Politician are not however going to tell Tokyoites to evacuate is impossible. It is logistically impossible to evacuate a city of 10 mln people. You would probably face more damage and death from the citizens panicking rather than the fallout.

While at the time being the honorable Matt Alt is correct, it is not a situation where we as Tokyoites need to panic, the sitaution is a high gamma (sorry for the pun) situation (high gamma situation is a finance term that means highly volatile). The situation can change in a matter of hours. While it does not make sense to panic now, it does not hurt to have contingency plans. As of now, I am thinking of ways out of Tokyo if the need arises.
Sanjeev (Admin)
thomas Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Me thinks a lot of 'journalists' need to get back
> to school, and get some reading comprehension and
> critical research lessons.

Nah. At this point, I'm convinced it's completely intentional fear-mongering.
While I initiated the "filter the hype" comment earlier (based on my own experience with the 89 SF quake) I readily admit things are worse than I thought. If our standard of bad is Chernobyl, or standard might possibly be too low. I am glad this reopens the conversation since in the US we appeared to be on the road to more plants without enough scepticism (though not at such a horrific cost). We also need to recognize the heroic efforts of technicians staying at the plant continuing to work to keep containment - this was not the case in India some years back, where techs paniced and fled which allowed a workable situation to escalate into something more dire. As well-protected as I'm sure they are, that is still some fortitude, professionalism and selflessness right there.
Is the situation escalating or flatlined at "Bad"? The genuine risk assessment appears to be all or nothing, meaning, either this is a location specific environmental disaster or it's a global environmental disaster...and it's nowhere near the latter right? So, and please correct me if I'm wrong, why has the media ubiquitously failed to point that out? All the major outlets, liberal, conservative, whatever, are all echoing the same " ongoing nuclear catastrophe" line at a time when people should really be paying full attention to helping the masses affected by the quake/tsunami, and it's bugging the shit out of me. It's a case study on how dysfunctional we have become, IMHO. It's like a manufactured flaw in the collective human psyche, that somehow we WANT to experience this fear to validate decades of anti-nuke conditioning. And I'm not necessarily pro-nuke, but I do think it's a hell of a lot better than fossil fuel dependence. And, if alternatives like thorium could build plants that *can't* melt down then DUH, no-brainer. But all I see is Big Oil loving this moment and saying to themselves, "Cha-Ching! ...one more viable alternative off the list".
Mike Parisi Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> But all I see is Big Oil
> loving this moment and saying to themselves,
> "Cha-Ching! ...one more viable alternative off the
> list".

Hard not to think that this is EXACTLY what the media is pushing for here...

But then, I tend towards paranoia.

More serious than thou
Sanjeev (Admin)
Mike Parisi Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Is the situation escalating or flatlined at "Bad"?

Flatlined at bad. And of course, it all depends on how you define "bad". It SUCKS for those onsite workers who paid the ultimate price during the hydrogen explosions. It's no good for the company...or the industry, apparently. For general population? It's fucking fine...as it's always been.

> The genuine risk assessment appears to be all or
> nothing, meaning, either this is a location
> specific environmental disaster or it's a global
> environmental disaster...and it's nowhere near the
> latter right?

Correct. And even "location specific" is lending a bit more than is probably needed. My homeboy just told me about a natural gas leak in SF that blew up 8 homes. That FAR more public damage than will EVER result from these events at the nuclear reactors in Japan. Yet no one is shitting themselves over that...

> ...why has the media ubiquitously failed to
> point that out?

Again, greed or political agendas.

> ...at a time when
> people should really be paying full attention to
> helping the masses affected by the quake/tsunami,
> and it's bugging the shit out of me. It's a case
> study on how dysfunctional we have become, IMHO.
> It's like a manufactured flaw in the collective
> human psyche, that somehow we WANT to experience
> this fear to validate decades of anti-nuke
> conditioning.

YES. THIS.

> And I'm not necessarily pro-nuke,
> but I do think it's a hell of a lot better than
> fossil fuel dependence.

I'm definitely pro-nuke. And not to trod on what LeMel said--I'm all about scientific skepticism and rigorous validation of technology (obviously). But the West has a stranglehold on fossil fuels...and ain't about to give that up. Meanwhile, less developed nations don't have the technology or infrastructure to maintain viable nuclear programs. So...the West stubbornly dick-riding fossil fuels FUCKS the rest of the world. Shocker.

Fuck...I don't even give that much of a shit about fission. There'll never be a way to prove this of course, but I wouldn't be surprised if we could have fusion by now if fossil fuel interests backed research into it (let alone likely blocking it behind the scenes)...

> And, if alternatives like
> thorium could build plants that *can't* melt down
> then DUH, no-brainer. But all I see is Big Oil
> loving this moment and saying to themselves,
> "Cha-Ching! ...one more viable alternative off the
> list".

Yup. But like I said, the REAL solution to all of this is fusion. In fact, now that I get what you mean, I'm now certain thorium's not going to help. A thorium reactor would still be a fission chain reaction. ALL chain reactions can run away and overheat if not designed smart. Fusion is NOT a chain reaction: if any part of a fusion reactor breaks, it just stops and no new energy is produced.

Fuck who killed the electric car; I wanna know who's killing the fusion reactor...
Could be straight-up vaporware, but my dego brethren are claiming a fusion breakthrough.

[www.physorg.com]


Well, the entire edifice of western civilization has been constructed out of oil, and there really is *nothing* that can replace it given the current population/consumption rates. So in that respect, I'm pro-ANYTHING that isn't oil, just so we can alter this seemingly unavoidable trajectory towards certain doom. But yeah, whoever designs a real free-energy device, or taps into Tesla's galactic sound waves, or makes a functional cold fusion reactor BETTER put the plans in spam-cannon and saturate the whole planet quickly, before they to get eaten by the oil mon$ter.
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