Ashley Wood 3A Stuff

Posted by fujikuro 
Thanks, G. It's the fullsize one. Been tempted to pick up one of the SDCC Portable Heavy Brambs, but I don't collect NW/DW in Portable. Waiting for the retailer preorders so I can get my JEA on.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Prometheum5 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I wrote a sweet review of the Action Portable
> Tomorrow Kings that have come out so far on
> CollectionDX...

I just noticed that the TKs seem a little large. Their noggins are noticeably bigger than the severed heads that the WWRp figures have come with. The pics in your review make the TKs look more in scale with the WWR Heavy Bramble than they might against the WWRp...

Oh, and do the feet on yours pop-off all the time?
The feet do not pop off all the time, but yes, they are easy to remove if you try and pose the ankle to far. With that Hot Toys double-ball style ankle, though, you get some pretty insane motion, so you have to have it nearly at a right angle to pop them out.

Not sure about the sizing stuff... the heads and hands on the TKs are chunky in general, which matches the art. As human figures, though, they look really great next to the Portable bots. The thing is, in Popbot some of the Mortis badguy warbots are huuuuge. Like, 1/6 scale Popbot to 1/12 scale TK big, if not larger, so the little TKs do look really nice facing off against a massive fullsize bot. Popbot and Badbot are supposed to be like 9 feet tall, but I was thinking you could customize an extra 1/6 Badbot into a perfect adversary for your 1/12 TKs.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Prometheum5 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Not sure about the sizing stuff...

(This is going to be ACRONYM hell.)

Do the de Plume figures have the same proportions as the TKs? I haven't looked at the WWR book lately, but I remember in "Zombies vs. Robots vs. Amazons" that the Zombfucker Bertie was BIG and towered over the humans. I always expected the human figures to be aroun 4.5" to 5" tall based on that. But the TKs are taller than the WWRp Dropcloth and Bertie. They only look right next to, say, Bramble or Armstrong. I don't have any WWR figures, so I was wondering if the discrepancies in the 1:12 scale were the same for the 1:6 scale...

And, agreed, the should totally make a 14" Devilbot to pit against the TKs...
1/6 human = 12" :. 1/12 human = 6" The little TKs and Plume are the exact same body, so same proportions. Maybe because of the helmet and mask, Plume's head seems a little smaller.

In WWR the Bertie Mk2 is more in line with humans... here's a photo from my old de Plume review:



Bertie/Zomb Fucker from ZvRvA is totally different, and his scale does shift a lot in that comic. In general, though, you are right that he is a much bigger bot... taller, and especially heftier and stumpier. It gets kind of wonky because they did a Zomb Fucker as one of the WWR Bertie Mk2 versions, but you just have to take that at face value as a 'reinterpretation'.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
You know, after I posted last night I went and pulled the WWR harcover off the bookshelf. There's definitely some scale shifting going on in there relative to the human actors. In some scenes the Brambles and Berties look like they're the same height (at the shoulders, not the head) as the humans; in others, the humans only come up to the elbows of the bots. The Large Martins look absolutely ginormous in the mobs of people. And I was surprised to see the Dropcloths looking shorter than the humans. I have to pull out the lone WWR DC I have and set it next to a 1:6 dolly to see if it is as relatively short as the WWRp version.

I also pulled out the Popbot hardcover. Goddamn, that story is a mess. The narrative is probably interesting, but the execution makes it nigh indigestible. Felt like there were only 29 cards out of the standard deck present. Reading each page like a single, disconnected snapshot improved things. But, still.

Oh, and definitely bring on Devilbot. We need that.
Heh, yeah... I finally got the Big Beautiful Book Popbot collection and read through the whole 'story' for the first time. It's definitely beautiful, but it's not quite what I was expecting as a comic. It's a loosely strung together collection of vignettes that fit together in a world, but most of the storytelling is focused more around tone and setting than actual narrative development. It reminds me of the Glyos approach, where he sets up a universe and some neat happenings, and then lets you fill in the rest with your own adventures. Fun, and inspirational, but still not what I was expecting.

What drives me nuts are the inconsistencies within stories... Pop switches from having a hook to a hand within panels of the same moment. I'm not sure if the implication is that it's transformable/retractable like on a Transformer, or if he's really just that inconsistent as an illustrator.

I also tried to explain Popbot to Sanjeev one day over IM, and I think he nearly cried. That loose of an approach to storytelling is just not for some people.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Sanjeev (Admin)
I have no problem with loose story-telling. I have a problem with blatant (and moronic) Terminator rip-offs. A sex-robot revolution? Really???
The overall tone of Popbot was off, but there are still some jewels in it. By the time I was done reading it I really had no sense of what had transpired in the "story" and I was pissed at how uneven the artistic direction was - some panels are glorious, concert-poster juxtapositions of tits and robots while others are so thrown together that it is impossible to tell what they represent. I sincerely wish they'd had a better editor because with the freshness of the designs and absurdity of the themes it could have been a watershed work. Instead, it's just cool-but-cripplingly-unbalanced.
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The overall tone of Popbot was off, but there are
> still some jewels in it. By the time I was done
> reading it I really had no sense of what had
> transpired in the "story" and I was pissed at how
> uneven the artistic direction was - some panels
> are glorious, concert-poster juxtapositions of
> tits and robots while others are so thrown
> together that it is impossible to tell what they
> represent. I sincerely wish they'd had a better
> editor because with the freshness of the designs
> and absurdity of the themes it could have been a
> watershed work. Instead, it's just
> cool-but-cripplingly-unbalanced.


And yet it won some kind of award for visual story-telling. There are some really great parts mixed in with the inconsistent parts. Overall, I like the general narrative. Mortis sex-bot revolution seemed like a pretty great way to tie together the bots and tits that he draws/paints so well. The scenes with the TKs in action, and the later Popwar stuff are great. Some of the 'characters' are neat designs in the earlier half, even if they don't flow all that well. Sherlock Holmes with a Futurama-style head in a jar on his shoulders? Priceless.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
I am (and plan on remaining) blissfully unaware of what any of the stories are for any of the 3A lines. I approach the toys on a strictly aesthetic level. I have a loose understanding of who the characters are, but know nothing about the actual stories. My enjoyment of the product is in no way effected by my lack of knowledge.
fel9 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> My enjoyment of the product is in no way
> effected by my lack of knowledge.


It wouldn't matter much if you had read them or not. There's very little "story" to go along with the images. It just happened that I was already familiar with both WWR and ZvRvA before the toys came along. To me, the books give a menacing sense of scale between the humans and robots that the toys don't seem to follow as closely.

Somewhat unrelated, I remember back in high school a friend of mine showed me a comic book and said, "The story in this is really intense. You should check it out." And I said, "The art sucks. There's no way I'm reading this." He was taken aback. I explained that, for me, "pretty pictures" are a necessary minimum for any visual-narrative project. The two books referenced above are a counterpoint to that; while good images are a necessity, they cannot make up for a lack of story. You gotta have both.

But not for toys.
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> fel9 Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
>
> But not for toys

Yeah, I always enjoy my internal narrative way more than the ones that usually come with the toys....
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> fel9 Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > My enjoyment of the product is in no way
> > effected by my lack of knowledge.
>
>
> It wouldn't matter much if you had read them or
> not. There's very little "story" to go along with
> the images. It just happened that I was already
> familiar with both WWR and ZvRvA before the toys
> came along. To me, the books give a menacing
> sense of scale between the humans and robots that
> the toys don't seem to follow as closely.
>
> Somewhat unrelated, I remember back in high school
> a friend of mine showed me a comic book and said,
> "The story in this is really intense. You should
> check it out." And I said, "The art sucks.
> There's no way I'm reading this." He was taken
> aback. I explained that, for me, "pretty
> pictures" are a necessary minimum for any
> visual-narrative project. The two books
> referenced above are a counterpoint to that; while
> good images are a necessity, they cannot make up
> for a lack of story. You gotta have both.
>
> But not for toys.

I followed that same principle reading comics as a kid, that the pictures have to pretty.

Lately I've been reading Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. The art isn't exactly what I'd consider "good" (a totally unqualified and meaningless term for all concerned) but that's part of the intent (and based on the art for the chapter covers, she's capable of drawing in styles more to my preference). Same goes for Persepolis.

These days I'm more open to what the visual style is suited for, how it's purposed for the sake of story, and whether there's story enough to carry the work.

If Jimmy Corrigan's story didn't suck ass so much, I wouldn't have minded the art nearly as much.
gingaio Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I followed that same principle reading comics as a
> kid, that the pictures have to pretty.

I still do. I should have qualified the "pretty pictures" part. It would have been more accurate to say "visually engaging" - the ineffable combination of line, color, form, and layout that keeps your eye moving across the page.


> Story; Fun Home; Persepolis.

I don't have a general preference for any particular style, so I have zero problem with their respective visuals. In fact, they're quite polished with regard to the tone they're attempting to create. They work, and they work well. To riff off of something dished out in another thread, you can read "good" art from "bad" art through the deliberation the artist puts into it. Of course, this is not to say spontaneous art is bad and that all polished art is good. It's more like, "Did the artist hit their target?"

Wrapping this back around to my example, I can't recall what the particular comic was. It must have been either a mainstream Marvel or DC rag from the 1990s. If the editorial target had been, "Barely coherent enough to qualify for the obviously rushed, money grubbing overload of A-list character titles with crossovers", then, yes, it perfectly captured the zeitgeist of that era in the industry. Everything about the line, color, form, and layout actively worked to repel my retinas.

And now I'm beginning to think that the Flash was in it. And he totally fucking sucks. There is no such thing as a good Flash story. Aside from the animated New Frontier movie. And it was only 30% Flash.


> If Jimmy Corrigan's story didn't suck ass so much,
> I wouldn't have minded the art nearly as much.

I wasn't crazy about Jimmy Corrigan, but I think Ware's style and narrative approach are impeccable - with regard to what is his intent. His clean lines and geometric use of space make the stories eminently readable. Probably my favorite piece from his is the Acme Novelty Library. That shit is chock-a-block full of meta-narrative, especially the infomatic aisdes discussing comics-as-pictures-as-stories. The amount of focus he puts in the images in readily apparent.

I caught shit before for pissing on "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen", but it's my Jimmy Corrigan to your Jimmy Corrigan. I could never, ever get into it because O'Neill's art and general layout felt half-finished about 90% of the time. The character designs were good, but lacked a polished execution. Anyway.

To tie this back to Ashley Wood, I'd take nearly any of his X (More) Nudes compendiums over Popbot anyday. Because they hit the same high notes (exciting splashes and single page images) without the same lows (chopped-up narrative with lots of missing pieces). WWR works better than Popbot in that regard, too, but the pieces of back-story in the former by his wife were just so-so.

I've heard it said that editors are inimical to creativity, but I'm convinced Popbot, and to some extent WWR, could have benefited greatly (as stories) from one with more teeth.
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> > Story; Fun Home; Persepolis.
>
> I don't have a general preference for any
> particular style, so I have zero problem with
> their respective visuals. In fact, they're quite
> polished with regard to the tone they're
> attempting to create. They work, and they work
> well. To riff off of something dished out in
> another thread, you can read "good" art from "bad"
> art through the deliberation the artist puts into
> it. Of course, this is not to say spontaneous art
> is bad and that all polished art is good. It's
> more like, "Did the artist hit their target?"
>
The problem I have with the "how much thought did the artist put into the work" criteria (and I'm not attributing this to you) is that there's a lot of art that has had a lot of thought put into it that's crap.

I think, though, what we're talking about is (in)competency, as I can see a lot of superhero art being very incompetent.

Back to the "how much thought..." bit. Again, I'd rephrase it as competency/literacy in the respective art. It's part of a technique vs. effect argument, which is a flawed dichotomy, as they aren't at all mutually exclusive terms. But personally I wouldn't consider polish/competency as a primary criteria for "good" (meaning stuff that I actually like).

Douglas Wolk kind of weaves this argument in Reading Comics when he posits his preference for a "unique aesthetic" over all other criteria (such as emotional effect, characterization, etc) in comics.

> Wrapping this back around to my example, I can't
> recall what the particular comic was. It must
> have been either a mainstream Marvel or DC rag
> from the 1990s. If the editorial target had been,
> "Barely coherent enough to qualify for the
> obviously rushed, money grubbing overload of
> A-list character titles with crossovers", then,
> yes, it perfectly captured the zeitgeist of that
> era in the industry. Everything about the line,
> color, form, and layout actively worked to repel
> my retinas.
>
Wolk generalizes about superhero stuff being 95% garbage, and I'm hard pressed to disagree.

> And now I'm beginning to think that the Flash was
> in it. And he totally fucking sucks. There is no
> such thing as a good Flash story. Aside from the
> animated New Frontier movie. And it was only 30%
> Flash.
>
Ironic given that the Flash (in Showcase #4) was the first Silver Age comic (again, per Wolk).

>
> I wasn't crazy about Jimmy Corrigan, but I think
> Ware's style and narrative approach are impeccable
> - with regard to what is his intent. His clean
> lines and geometric use of space make the stories
> eminently readable.

The art couldn't save it for me. But I remember you recommending his aging superhero-actor one that I've yet to follow up on.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/27/2011 10:37PM by gingaio.
Squirrely editing or not, Pop arrived today and is great!



Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
I still don't really care for the design of Popbot...I hate the hook hand...

As for art, (which is what I do and teach for a living) there have been many good points from this and the other thread. Basically good art,is good whether I like it or not, and bad is universally bad. I have given many good grades to paintings, illustrations, etc. that I did not enjoy aesthetically, but I could still see the artistic merit. I could see the work...mental, physical, and psychological. It is there. Bad art has none of the hallmarks of work or care or love. I agree 100% with whoever said in the other thread that when a student starts to explain the process and what the art means it is not a good sign. If they are having to do that much work on the back end of a project getting me to understand their art, then they haven't done enough work on the front end getting it to a point where it doesn't need to be explained. Seems simple enough.

As for comics and editing, I think that the more successful comics tend to be from folks who have flair for sequential design. It is one thing to make a pretty picture, it is another to get a series of pretty pictures to tell a story. I can't tell you how many students I get who want to be comic artists. They take illustration classes (as they should) and think that they are done. I then tell them that they are only a third of the way there. The need to study sequential design and storyboarding. In addition they need to spend some time learning about scripting scenes and script writing. And that is only on the art side of comics. If a solid tightly edited story isn't there then all the pretty pictures in the world can't save it...

Sorry for being so long winded...carry on...
fel9 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> As for comics and editing, I think that the more
> successful comics tend to be from folks who have
> flair for sequential design. It is one thing to
> make a pretty picture, it is another to get a
> series of pretty pictures to tell a story.

This is pretty much my criticism of Pobot and WWR - some good pictures, lots of terrible sequence. And since I'm pimping Ware's ACN, here's a snippit of one of his meta-narrative asides on cartooning and/or illustration.

"...CARTOONING is not really DRAWING at all, but a complicated pictographic language intended to be READ, not really SEEN!"




At the risk of stretching a metaphor and then punching it in its crooked-ass teeth, the reason bad layout and sequence fuck up a comic/graphic-novel/picture-book is because it garbles the syntax. Ergo, Popbot is guilty of bad language and sweet tits.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/28/2011 09:35AM by Gcrush.
Attachments:
open | download - IMG_20110928_091548.jpg (93.6 KB)
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Ergo, Popbot is guilty of bad
> language and sweet tits.

Which seems to be a common problem with many comics. Although I will admit that only one of those things is less damning than the other....there is no excuse for bad language...
gingaio Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The problem I have with the "how much thought did
> the artist put into the work" criteria (and I'm
> not attributing this to you) is that there's a lot
> of art that has had a lot of thought put into it
> that's crap.

Eh, I was using "thoughtfulness" as a proxy for intentionality. This includes the certain minimum of technical skill needed to achieve said, otherwise a work will end up being something other than what the artist envisioned.

To tie this back into PB/WWR, Wood definitely has the technical skill and "picture vision" down. But the "story vision" is really, really weak. I've heard someone say that PB is not meant to be read as a traditional comic per se, but if that's the case why did they format and print it as such? It's not post-modern enough to justify the "not-comic comic" line...


> Back to the "how much thought..." bit. Again, I'd
> rephrase it as competency/literacy in the
> respective art. It's part of a technique vs.
> effect argument, which is a flawed dichotomy, as
> they aren't at all mutually exclusive terms. But
> personally I wouldn't consider polish/competency
> as a primary criteria for "good" (meaning stuff
> that I actually like).

In my mind I'm actually going one easier and equating intentionality with "good enough" - that highly subjective agreement laid out between the artist and the audience.


> The art couldn't save it for me. But I remember
> you recommending his aging superhero-actor one
> that I've yet to follow up on.

I pulled out ACN yesterday for a refresher. I still love it to pieces, though the layout bugs me at times - even though I get what Ware is doing with it. Like, I still want all of the glorious Rocket Sam and Frank Phosphate pages to be collated. Not to mention The Superman stuff. The book literally makes me want to take it apart and reprint it. Which also strikes me as pretty awesome.
fel9 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Gcrush Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Ergo, Popbot is guilty of bad
> > language and sweet tits.
>
> Which seems to be a common problem with many
> comics. Although I will admit that only one of
> those things is less damning than the
> other....there is no excuse for bad language...


Amen!
Who likes to grunt....i does...
Attachments:
open | download - grunt.jpg (54.3 KB)
fel9 Wrote:
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> Who likes to grunt....i does...


Totally slept on the Grunts, since they didn't match anything I had at the time. Now that I have a 666th Desert Corps Caesar on preorder, I realllllly want to snag a Desert Grunt.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
I picked out the Deep Powder because....well, not really sure now but he is badass...
Technical questions.

I bought a used WWRp Zwarte-merc Bertie off of Ebay. The Gatling gun and ammo belt it came with look suspiciously like the one that came with my WWRp Sandy Fuck Bertie. The colors are nearly indistinguishable. All the photos I've seen on-line show Zwartie's gun with white-ish barrels, an orange-ish drum on the bottom, and a dark ammo belt. I pose the following questions:

1. Are the two guns supposed to be differently colored?

2. Are those differences noticeable?
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Technical questions.
>
> I bought a used WWRp Zwarte-merc Bertie off of
> Ebay. The Gatling gun and ammo belt it came with
> look suspiciously like the one that came with my
> WWRp Sandy Fuck Bertie. The colors are nearly
> indistinguishable. All the photos I've seen
> on-line show Zwartie's gun with white-ish barrels,
> an orange-ish drum on the bottom, and a dark ammo
> belt. I pose the following questions:
>
> 1. Are the two guns supposed to be differently
> colored?
>
> 2. Are those differences noticeable?


My CDX review tells all ;)
[www.collectiondx.com]

The Zwerte Toren Bertie did come with a white-barreled and orange-canistered gun, with a sort of rosey-colored ammo belt:



Compared to Sandy Fuck:



Are they different? Yes.
Will you die from it? Probably not... how much did you pay for it?

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Prometheum5 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Are they different? Yes.
> Will you die from it? Probably not... how much
> did you pay for it?


I paid the average aftermarket mark-up for something that was described as MIB. The money wasn't outrageous, but I already have a Sandy and don't care to have two of the same gun. Moreover, I don't like the whiff of misrepresentation that comes from something like this. I contacted the seller to see if maybe he's got the right gun laying around somewhere so we can swap them out. We'll see what he says.

Anyway, it's odd that most of the recent sketchy transactions I've had on Evilbay as a buyer are related to WWRp stuff. Why is that?
BTW, I'm selling off my 3a Stuff (1/12 and 1/6), in case anyone is interested. Posting a thread in the Market about it and on Kidrobot as well.

More serious than thou
First shot of the prototype MaK Krote. Looks like spinny gun and light up gimmicks are in ...well at least in the proto...Now the question is, "will this actually get made...?"
Attachments:
open | download - krote.jpg (30.6 KB)
Ben, or anyone else with the knowledgesperience...

Any idea how to paint weathering like 3A? I want to touch-up the Commie Large Martin, specifically the shitty silver edge-wear on it. I want to make it look more like the current releases. Suggestions?
Also, I just realized that we've been waiting for seven months for the WWRp Dropcloth packs from 3A to ship - three months past their original goal. Is it my imagination or are they speeding up?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/10/2011 10:07PM by Gcrush.
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Ben, or anyone else with the
> knowledgesperience...
>
> Any idea how to paint weathering like 3A? I want
> to touch-up the Commie Large Martin, specifically
> the shitty silver edge-wear on it. I want to make
> it look more like the current releases.
> Suggestions?


I get exactly what you mean with the older Large Martin paint not being quite up to snuff, and from scratch I could totally paint a figure that would fit right alongside 3A's current stuff. Trying to touch up an existing figure would be a whole other challenge... they're using a lot of sponge work and dark brown colors to do their weathering now, which is more convincing, but you'd have a tough time eliminating the too-shiny silver effect without having to slather that guy with paint.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
If all you are wanting to do is tone down the shiny silver then my advice, short of re-priming and painting, would be to apply a thin layer of a translucent neutral (like brown or grey) over the offending silver. Nothing that will obscure the paint totally, but something that will allow the underlying paint to show through while making the silver less noticeable. With the red of that paint scheme I'd go for a muddy brown color. Trying to get rid of it entirely would be difficult.
Anonymous User
[www.threeaonline.com]

Out in 2 months and no price yet...
Prometheum5 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I get exactly what you mean with the older Large
> Martin paint not being quite up to snuff, and from
> scratch I could totally paint a figure that would
> fit right alongside 3A's current stuff.

Fill me in, man - I'm all ears. I might be able to borrow from your techniques to accomplish what I'm considering doing to the paint. I've successfully done sponge work on larger 2D pieces, but not on a smaller or 3D medium. How do you get the paint and texture to consistency?


fel9 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> If all you are wanting to do is tone down the
> shiny silver then my advice, short of re-priming
> and painting, would be to apply a thin layer of a
> translucent neutral (like brown or grey) over the
> offending silver.

Here's what I'm thinking. I might actually ratchet up the silver paint into larger, uniform swaths. Drop some rock-salt on those silver areas and then apply a combination of deep red and ruddy brown paint. Brush the salt off to reveal the silver "chips" in the paint and then give it a rust colored wash. It won't exactly duplicate the current paint styles on 3A stuff, but it should be a damn sight better than what Large Marty looks like right now.
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Prometheum5 Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > I get exactly what you mean with the older
> Large
> > Martin paint not being quite up to snuff, and
> from
> > scratch I could totally paint a figure that
> would
> > fit right alongside 3A's current stuff.
>
> Fill me in, man - I'm all ears. I might be able
> to borrow from your techniques to accomplish what
> I'm considering doing to the paint. I've
> successfully done sponge work on larger 2D pieces,
> but not on a smaller or 3D medium. How do you get
> the paint and texture to consistency?
>


I've done a bunch of stuff like these, which are basically done the same way 3A is doing it, with more subtlety.







It's a combination of sponging on the weathering first, and then blending everything together a bit more with some muddy washes. I use those little wedge-shaped makeup applicator sponges. I tear off the narrow end roughly, and that gives me an irregular surface that I can use a number of ways to put down the paint. The biggest thing is fiddling with the consistency of the paint... you want to err on the thick side so the paint stays where you put it, and is totally opaque, at least for the actual chipping. A lot of the perceived texture of the weathering on 3A's figs seems to come from the thickness of the paint itself, which you can use to your advantage on the larger surfaces of their figures. Your salt-technique over the existing silver could work, but if one of your color mixes is off and the red/brown doesn't blend right you might have a tougher time fixing it.

If I were going to go for the least risky seeming solution, I would probably just try and throw a couple of brown tone washes over the silver areas. The actual application of the silver isn't terrible, but the shininess of it makes it stand out, especially since the silver is not perfectly opaque, making it look like silver paint over the red, rather than silver exposed under the red. Muting the silver into general 'damage' would make it stand out less.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Thanks, Ben. You've given me some good ideas!

By the way, do you use anything for a sealant? Those all look nice and matty-matte-matte.
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks, Ben. You've given me some good ideas!
>
> By the way, do you use anything for a sealant?
> Those all look nice and matty-matte-matte.


The Microfighter and the Glyos fig were airbrushed with MK and sealed using MK gloss first, and then I do all the weathering on top. Last step I use an artists' acrylic matte varnish that I can check the name of later for a final topcoat. It's a matte varnish for canvases, I think, and it dries the most dead flat of any topcoat I've used. The little guy was painted all with brushes, and then I apply two coats of Future gloss, followed by the matte. Everything I do gets one of those two processes, because I am super anal about paint durability and final finish.

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
Prometheum5 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>
> If I were going to go for the least risky seeming
> solution, I would probably just try and throw a
> couple of brown tone washes over the silver areas.
> The actual application of the silver isn't
> terrible, but the shininess of it makes it stand
> out, especially since the silver is not perfectly
> opaque, making it look like silver paint over the
> red, rather than silver exposed under the red.
> Muting the silver into general 'damage' would make
> it stand out less.

Yeah this is what I was trying to get at...Toning down the silver would be what I would go after...

You need to seal your work to give it an overall sheen be it gloss or matte...Heck just an over spray of matte might be enough to even out the silver...

Oh and Prometheum5 great work as always....
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