Let the Right One In

Posted by gingaio 
Anyone see this flick?

You should.

Before the inevitable American remake (sometime in 2010, I think).

Really good.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
So freakin' awesome!! It was actually playing next door to my house so I got to see it on the big screen.. Highly recommended.
I just got it from Netflix, watching it this weekend.
Apparently the US dvd subtitles were dumbed down and completely different then the theatrical subs. A bunch of screen caps here: [iconsoffright.com]
Just took a look. Some of the scenes, the deletion of words meant less flavor for some of the characters. That I get.

But in other cases, I don't see what the fuss is about; e.g.--

Swedish Version:
"How old are you?"
"12...more or less."

American Version:
"How old are you?"
"12...about"

Like, there's that big of a difference?

Anyway, whatever. Great film, with or without the edited subtitles.

Sjoen, I would have never figured you for the arthouse movie type. I remember watching Ghost Dog in a theater up in the Richmond district...I was visiting my brother and I got locked out while he and his wife were at work, so I killed some time at the movies.
Since I'm talking about movies...another really good movie I saw recently on DVD was Before the Devil Knows You're Dead. For the longest time that one just slipped under my radar.

Oh, and I saw Fast and Furious today. Totally stupid and mind-numbing in a sort of good way.
I saw Death Race recently, loved it.
Can someone clarify the point of showing Oskar's father's friend at the table? What was going on there?
Yeah, that was a weird scene. I figured it was probably just one of those things that was more developed and explained in the novel.
I Wrote:
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> Yeah, that was a weird scene. I figured it was
> probably just one of those things that was more
> developed and explained in the novel.


I *think* there was some implied homoerotic tension between the friend and the dad. Maybe because of the general themes in the film. Did anyone else get that from the scene?

Also, anyone notice that the only explicitly heterosexual couple in the movie had as dysfunctional relationship as everyone else? Nice touch. Few films really hit all the angles like that.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
"Sjoen, I would have never figured you for the arthouse movie type."

Well, you really don't know me. You know my alter ego here, which is only a sliver of my reality. I'm actually pretty involved believe it or not.. [sfntf.org]

"I remember watching Ghost Dog in a theater up in the Richmond district.."

Ha! You're talking about either the 4 Star or the Balboa. I can see the 4 Star from my corner. I've been going there since I was 12. Love film. We go once a week. Not a big fan of Hollywood flicks, but anything geeky I'm so there. We have some of the best theaters here is SF for independent film, Sundance Kabuki for example is probably the nicest and most diverse.

BTW, totally forgot about Ghost Dog. Need to see that again. Jim Jarmusch is slick.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
Oh yeah, Eli is a boy. Nice vag shot.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
Gcrush Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Yeah, that was a weird scene. I figured it was
> > probably just one of those things that was more
> > developed and explained in the novel.
>
>
> I *think* there was some implied homoerotic
> tension between the friend and the dad. Maybe
> because of the general themes in the film. Did
> anyone else get that from the scene?
>
> Also, anyone notice that the only explicitly
> heterosexual couple in the movie had as
> dysfunctional relationship as everyone else? Nice
> touch. Few films really hit all the angles like
> that.

I totally agree. There were so many levels of tension going on in that scene. We don't know what Oskar knows or doesn't know about that situation and it's never discussed. When the friend walks in and shoots Oskar's dad the look, you just KNOW what's going on there.. I know that look. My wife just said "C'mon boys, read between the lines."

Also, the fact that he leaves and hitches home right after.. Hmmm..

This movie really left me hanging in many areas. That, in my opinion, is the sign of a good movie. I'm still thinking about it. I'm still pissed at it. Good stuff.
It wasn't the air of homoeroticism that I didn't get. That was clear, along with the subversive gender play throughout the film. You could even see that expressed in the bullying--the idea that Oskar is somewhat androgynous; the idea that Eli is, too, figuratively, symbolically; the idea that one of the weaker bullies is acting sort of like a fruit, the idea that Oskar gets whipped by a stick in a vaguely S&M (and educational) moment...whatever.

What I was didn't get was why we were even given this scene (w/ the dad) at all, given that it doesn't go anywhere. It doesn't have any effect on Oskar's progression or any bearing on the rest of the story. It doesn't give us insight into any of the characters--what's Oskar's reaction to his Dad's buddy? what's his Dad's reaction to Oskar's reaction or lack of one? What does his Dad expect or want to happen as far as his son?--and it doesn't move the plot along.

Don't get me wrong, I love randomness in movies, especially when it's entertaining, but this felt like one of those things that happens with adaptations, in which scenes or characters that are more developed in the source material are squeezed into a film and consequently feel out of place or underdeveloped.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/09/2009 01:44AM by gingaio.
To answer myself, I suppose one way you could look at the 2nd scene with the dad is that it contrasts with and is symmetrical to the 1st scene with the dad, in which Oskar demonstrates one of his rare moments of actual joy. So in the 2nd scene when he spots his Dad's lover and finds himself the third wheel, it's a nudge toward his relationship with Eli, as he gradually becomes more and more disconnected from his present life.

Yay.

I like that the scene asks you to fill in the blank, but it still feels like a bit of a half-assed scene to me.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/09/2009 01:56AM by gingaio.
Erik Sjoen Wrote:
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> This movie really left me hanging in many areas.
> That, in my opinion, is the sign of a good movie.

Akira left me hanging in many areas. And aside from the amazing animation, it sucked as a story (the movie version anyway, because there's no way it could have condensed all the story in the manga in a coherent manner).

Though I know what you mean in general.

I think.

> I'm still thinking about it.

This is a sign of a good movie.

Unless you're thinking about how much you hated it.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/09/2009 02:05AM by gingaio.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
see below:



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/10/2009 05:12AM by Erik Sjoen.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
gingaio Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Erik Sjoen Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > This movie really left me hanging in many
> areas.
> > That, in my opinion, is the sign of a good
> movie.
>
> Akira left me hanging in many areas. And aside
> from the amazing animation, it sucked as a story
> (the movie version anyway, because there's no way
> it could have condensed all the story in the manga
> in a coherent manner).
>
> Though I know what you mean in general.
>
> I think.
>

We're so on the same page here. You're response was spot on. Otomo's manga is amazing!!! I've read it at several different pit stops within my life at this point, and continue to get something new and different from it at every stop..

Much like any literary work of great significance, Katsuhiro Otomo's idea in it's raw form, much like Kafka's "Der Process" is totally "raw" and seemingly unfinished. Unlike Kafka's piece, as he died before finishing it, Ototmo had the opportunity to make it GREAT and failed perfectly. The Akira anime killed the truth of the original art in my opinon. Where, on the other hand, Orson Welles made the truth in Kafka's piece AKA "The Trial" a milestone of lunacy (or cinematic brilliance). Go fucking figure..

OK, I should go to sleep..

Sjoen


> > I'm still thinking about it.
>
> This is a sign of a good movie.
>
> Unless you're thinking about how much you hated
> it.

Ha ha! I was also fascinated with "choose your own adventure" books when I was a child.. You should see my collection.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 04/10/2009 05:17AM by Erik Sjoen.
I read the book and saw the movie. There is a lot more meat to the book. Think of the film as a distilled version. Well, that and there were several subplots hinted at in the film that are fully realized in the book. To me the greatest difference was in the appearance of Oskar.

I could go on and on, but the folks over at A.V.Club have a nice article that details the differences between the two for those who are interested. Danger: Thar be spoilers ahead...

[www.avclub.com]
Erik Sjoen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "I remember watching Ghost Dog in a theater up in
> the Richmond district.."
>
> Ha! You're talking about either the 4 Star or the
> Balboa. I can see the 4 Star from my corner.
>
No shit. Wow. My brother used to live near 21st and Geary, if I remember correctly, so I think it was the 4 Star, a tiny theater right around the corner.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/10/2009 04:11PM by gingaio.
fel9 Wrote:
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> I read the book and saw the movie. There is a lot
> more meat to the book. Think of the film as a
> distilled version.

Thanks for the link. From that synopsis, it seems like the book just went in a darker, seedier, gorier direction.

And oddly enough, the thing with the dad and his friend was like nothing we thought based on the movie. Interesting.

Reminds me of when I saw A History of Violence. Loved the movie, so I went back and checked out the graphic novel, which was, well, more graphic regarding one key point. The source material was definitely weaker in this case. Cronenberg did a great job.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/10/2009 04:15PM by gingaio.
fel9 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I could go on and on, but the folks over at
> A.V.Club have a nice article that details the
> differences between the two for those who are
> interested. Danger: Thar be spoilers ahead...
>
> [www.avclub.com]
> n,25503/


Interesting. So the dad's "friend" was really just a drinking buddy? Well, shit. It seems like that point sailed past all of us. Considering how much of the film dealt with relationships, I assumed it was just in that vein. Huh.

I didn't agree completely with some of that writer's take on the move adaptation, but it sounded like the book is shit. Using a squirrel's POV to relay information about the faceless vampire raging in the woods? That's ass-weasel level genius. I'm utterly pleased they "fixed" so many of those points in the transition from the page to the screen.

I always hate it when people absentmindedly say, "The movie could never be as good as the book." It's not always true. Next time I hear that I'm going to punch them in the mouth with a copy of Let the Right One In on DVD.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
gingaio Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Erik Sjoen Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > "I remember watching Ghost Dog in a theater up
> in
> > the Richmond district.."
> >
> > Ha! You're talking about either the 4 Star or
> the
> > Balboa. I can see the 4 Star from my corner.
> >
> No shit. Wow. My brother used to live near 21st
> and Geary, if I remember correctly, so I think it
> was the 4 Star, a tiny theater right around the
> corner.

I'm at 19th and Clement. 4 Star rocks. As a kid we used to skate there to watch Kung Fu on Saturdays at noon.. They would show Samurai movies on Sunday nights. Great placed. Glad it was saved!
I saw this the other night and really engjoyed it. A unique take on a vampire story, but holds to all the classic conventions.

As for the scene with the dad and his friend, I got the impression that the friend was his drug dealer, or vice versa.
Erik Sjoen (Admin)
Good one Mark. Didn't occur to me.

Saw the new Park Chan Wook film "Thirst" on Sat afternoon:

[www.youtube.com]

For those of you in SF it's playing at the Bridge Theater on Geary Blvd. Great flick!
Erik Sjoen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Good one Mark. Didn't occur to me.

I guess I know "That look" from experience? That was before I found God of course.




Just kidding. God can kiss my ass.

>
> Saw the new Park Chan Wook film "Thirst" on Sat
> afternoon:
>

You know, right after I watched let the right one in, I watched oldboy for the first time! What're the odds...
GoggleV Wrote:
> Apparently the US dvd subtitles were dumbed down
> and completely different then the theatrical subs.
> A bunch of screen caps here:
> [iconsoffright.com]

Having not seen this film yet, and only skimming this thread to avoid spoilers, this still caught my eye and concerned me. And some of those changes are terrible, totally losing the humor of a line. However, there's a link at the bottom of that page, to a more recent post, noting that the publisher has decided to change the subtitled to the fan-preferred theatrical version, and mark them "English (theatrical)" in the language specification. It makes me want to go pick up the DVD as a gesture of support to companies fixing problematic releases.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
Erik Sjoen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Saw the new Park Chan Wook film "Thirst" on Sat
> afternoon:
>
Looking forward to seeing that at some point.

Saw Park's Old Boy and was really impressed by the wit and stylistic flourish (though the Greek tragedy elements were a bit heavy-handed).

Then I saw Park's Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance and am now thoroughly convinced of how truly gifted he is. Given that he's often compared to Tarantino, it's only fair to say that Sympathy makes anything by Tarantino look like an exercise in idiotic, mean-spirited juvenilia.
cae
hmmmm - quite enjoyed "Let The Right One In" gonna have to check out these others ...

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer
Well, that didn't take long:

[www.youtube.com]
gingaio Wrote:
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> Well, that didn't take long:
>
> [www.youtube.com]

Wow. I'll have to put this on my movie list along with the upcoming Leonardo DiCaprio live-action Akira...

/sarcasm
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