Designer Toys Killed the Vinyl Star!

Posted by pocketmego 
cae
> I never see anyone talking about my toys over on SkullBrain for what its worth

You're wrong - they do.

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer
You don't speak or read japanese? That's interesting. I always assumed the old school Japanese toy guys like you, Matt, Alen, etc...could all speak Japanese at the drop of the hat. (Although I think Matt does speak Japanese since he lives there).

I never assumed you tried to market your stuff as Japanese toys and didn't mean to infer that if I did. I kind of see you and the Go-Hero guy as being on the same page. You are fascinated with nostalgia from a different culture that had some intrinsic effect on you so you duplicate that nostalgia through your own eyes and experience.

Ultraman came into my life at a very young age. I was staying ata a Daycare while my mom worked and I HATED that place. That show (along with G-Force which came on either right before or right after it) was my dailey escape. In fact my 12 inch C-3PO toy was Ultraman all the time. He'd fight my Shogun Godzilla in many a one-sided battle.


Anyway, back on topic...

What I am noticing via the info and perspectives being given on this thread is that there seems to be a small bit of cross-over between Vintage Vinyls and modern Designer Vinyls.

I mean an OBVIOUS connection with Max and GoHero, but also Gargamel and Secret Base, along with Neo kaiju, and some others, who seem to be making Big Time Expensive designer vinyls based on the feel and essence of oldschool hero and kiaju vinyls.

Do keep in mind that I fully expect to be taken to task about that statement, but the proof is in the designs.

-Ray



Mark_N Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "Much as I might love Mark and his Captain Max,
> and despite it being designed and produced by a
> Japanese American in a factory in Japan, it is
> still an American toy and probably gets wider
> dicussion at Skullbrain, along with Secret Base,
> Neo Kaiju, and Go Hero. "
>
> Actually you almost got it right .. but the toy is
> made in china ;-) Just to get it straight, I
> don't pretend to be a "true" Japanese toy
> company.. at least not in this lifetime. That
> would be impossible.. as you need to be born and
> raised in Japan ;-)
>
> In fact when I first showed Captain Maxx to
> Gargamel they liked it .. but the colors I chose
> they said were American colors (!) as they laughed
> at me ;-P I thought that was funny... or were they
> making fun of me ? ( just kidding ) I'm third
> generation Japanese-American, and as such I don't
> speak, read or understand Japanese ( yes I did go
> to Japanese school when I was young... but forgot
> it all - damn it ) anyways you can say my tastes
> growing up were typical American toys ( 12 inch
> Joes, Major Matt Mason etc ) plus being a huge
> Jack Kirby comic book fan .. those are my
> influences... Ultraman did not enter my life till
> I was 9 or 10 years old.. and even than no one
> told me the who or what he was. Anyways, without
> boring everyone this is where I'm coming from and
> why my stuff looks the way it does.. same is true
> for Steve Forde or even Tim Biskup. But like all
> fads and trends this all will peak and than there
> will be some left standing and some who leave the
> scene. Unlike art, making a toy is expensive... so
> in my case if I can not sell the current toy than
> there won't be a follow up..it's really that
> simple. I'm sure if one had a bigger bank acoount
> you could go on and on .. but in the end these
> figures are for sale - for sale equals profits...
> no profits, no toys.
> oh ya, I never see anyone talking about my toys
> over on SkullBrain for what its worth ... ;-)
>
>
> Mark
>
> www.maxtoyco.com
> www.toykarma.com
> www.ultramantoys.com
> www.marknagata.com

GREAT BIG SOFUBI LOVE!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/14/2007 05:21PM by pocketmego.
"You don't speak or read japanese? That's interesting."

kinda off topic but , yes, I'm a product of my parents both of whom were born here and their World War 2 experience in the Internment Camps during that time. You may not know but Japanese Americans from the western parts of the US had only a few days to leave all their property behind and only carry what they could... and we're taken to camps surrounded by barbwire and American soldiers just after Pearl Harbour. Despite awful conditions many joined the war effort to fight the Japan and Germany for America. After nearly 4 years,the war ended and my parents left to start their lives again.They never really talked about it , as most in their generation did not and did not really encourge me to seek out my heritage or any Japanese things.I suppose they thought it best to blend in and "be" more American than Americans. And in general Japanese Americans also have the highest rate of marrying outside their race ( my wife is chinese american ) and I think this is also a result of the wars effects. I would have visited Japan when I was younger, but my father told me I would not be welcomed...this I would later learn was from when he was in the Army. After Japan surrendered my father was sent to Japan during the Occupation. He saw how poor the population was.. starving etc.. but worst of all they called him a "traitor" for being on the American side and the American soldiers called him a "Jap ". This obviously left a lasting impression on him in a bad way. But I do have to say when I first went ot Japan back in 2001, I felt strangely at home and have been back many times since... the newer generation does not have these memories of the war.. so it's easier for me to fit in. So maybe time does heal some wounds ?

Mark
Wow, it makes me think. Thanks for the post.

I also find it encouragingly ironic, that you re-discovered a significant portion of your heritage through the innocent playthings of children. We don't often discuss the war in relation to our hobby stuff, but it is part of it. Because t shaped the views of so many.

I love my dad, of course. But, he grew up in Missouri in the 1950's and 60's. I still remember when I was little the few times I was at home watching Speed Racer, Ultraman, Godzilla movies, etc...

He would make the off-handed remarks and prejudice connotations. Thankfully that stuff never rubbed off on me. Now that I'm older of course, I can totally understand his point of view (even if I totally DO NOT condone it), because he grew up in that time period.

We just had a big discussion over on Monster Zero about the original Gojira vs the American Version and why it was released. A lot of people still don't understand America in the 1950s and why that movie would amost certainly have bombed here had it not been edited and sans Raymond Burr.

Hell, I still feel a little weird watching the uncut Space Battleship Yomato, when they are talking about the origins of the ship, but its part of the culture that shaped it. So when I buy a toy version of Yamato, it now has a different perspective than it did if I only watched Star Blazers (slickly getting back on topic :D ).

You've added a lot to this topic , Mark, and I can honestly say that it has been pretty cool getting to know the man behind all the hobby stuff. It gives me a new and more diverse perspective in your work.

-Ray




Mark_N Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "You don't speak or read japanese? That's
> interesting."
>
> kinda off topic but , yes, I'm a product of my
> parents both of whom were born here and their
> World War 2 experience in the Internment Camps
> during that time. You may not know but Japanese
> Americans from the western parts of the US had
> only a few days to leave all their property behind
> and only carry what they could... and we're taken
> to camps surrounded by barbwire and American
> soldiers just after Pearl Harbour. Despite awful
> conditions many joined the war effort to fight the
> Japan and Germany for America. After nearly 4
> years,the war ended and my parents left to start
> their lives again.They never really talked about
> it , as most in their generation did not and did
> not really encourge me to seek out my heritage or
> any Japanese things.I suppose they thought it best
> to blend in and "be" more American than Americans.
> And in general Japanese Americans also have the
> highest rate of marrying outside their race ( my
> wife is chinese american ) and I think this is
> also a result of the wars effects. I would have
> visited Japan when I was younger, but my father
> told me I would not be welcomed...this I would
> later learn was from when he was in the Army.
> After Japan surrendered my father was sent to
> Japan during the Occupation. He saw how poor the
> population was.. starving etc.. but worst of all
> they called him a "traitor" for being on the
> American side and the American soldiers called him
> a "Jap ". This obviously left a lasting impression
> on him in a bad way. But I do have to say when I
> first went ot Japan back in 2001, I felt strangely
> at home and have been back many times since... the
> newer generation does not have these memories of
> the war.. so it's easier for me to fit in. So
> maybe time does heal some wounds ?
>
> Mark

GREAT BIG SOFUBI LOVE!
What CAE so very well said....
boink
Roger Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> boink


Seriously? We totally have a current thread for discussing vinyl... what's with all this bumping of ancient threads everywhere?

Introducing Prometheus Rising Studio.
[prometheusrising.net]
I make 3D printed mecha action figures.
BOINK
Ben, don't try to understand. Just let him do his thing.
josh fraser (Moderator)
Don't think Ben, FEEL. It's like a finger pointing at the moon.... or something.
I have always been a fan of CAE's photography
josh fraser (Moderator)
toybotstudios Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I have always been a fan of CAE's photography

I am too, thats why I bought his new 2011 calender.

You all should too. ;-)
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