Getta Fewture Getter!

Posted by MattAlt 
MattAlt (Admin)
Taku "Professor Robo" Sato waxes eloquent about his upcoming Getter One diecast figure, Japanese versus American approaches to technology, and the impending invasion of Earth by the Dinosaur Empire.

Read all about it on AltJapan!
very cool...would love to see the sketches for the other figs he mentions
>very cool...would love to see the sketches for the other figs he mentions

ZP has them.[www.zincpanic.com]

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I asked if I have "Time For L-Gaim" but I got "No Reply From The Wind".



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/01/2006 09:01AM by Vincent Z..
Here's a link to some sketches that was shown at zincpanic.

[www.zincpanic.com]
The "G" team will always be my favorites, but his take on One, Two and Three are the first versions I've really liked.

Instead of "re-envisioning" them, I like his take about how this is how he thinks they would have looked if the camera showed more detail back then. His designs definitely add to the originals without taking anything away. Verry nice.

Thanks, Matt.

Jape
I would love to see his version of Grendizer and the Spazer.
That rocks. Thanks Matt!
> M: Are those caterpillar treads rubber?
>
> S: Yes! And they work! See? Br-r-r-r-m!
> (Makes robot sound as he drives it across the tabletop and laughs.)

I think Mr. Sato is living his dreams. :) Wow.

-Paul Segal

"Oh, the anger is never far, never far." -SteveH
This was a really interesting article. I've felt conflicted over these designs (am I the only one?), because, while there are elements that I like, some of the features (the skull-like faces, the kanji on the back plugs, the fact that Getter-2 has an actual HAND) repelled me. I really enjoyed being able to hear his reasoning for the designs, as well as his discussion on the nature of Power vs. Weaponry in the Super Robot Era. His explanations a lot of insight into why his industrial theme is so fitting with the subject matter.
On that note, was there anyone else who thought the D-1 design just didn't work? I remember going through the sketches when they were put up on ZP and being really impressed until I got to Dragonar. I saw that one and was like, "Oh...he drew Dragonar."

Anyway, thanks for the awesome interview Matt. I'm eager to see the standing Getter-3.
cae
Great interview but I hate the looks of these things. It's like McFarlane got ahold of them.

Oh, well. To each their own.

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hassenpfeffer
Didn't you used to be a big McFarlane fan? I know you dumped most of your collection around the time he went mainstream, but does that mean he's a dirty word now? The guy knows how to sculpt.

Jape
cae
> Didn't you used to be a big McFarlane fan?

Well, while my scale has remained relatively static since I was 21, yes, I used to collect McFarlane toys. I also used to wear diapers and even had a full head of hair at one point.

> I know you dumped most of your collection around the time he went mainstream

The implication being that I did so in an attempt to appear edgy? I dumped the bulk of my plastic action figure (not just McFarlane) collection after the company stopped making toys and started making brittle statues - and after having my tastes refined by exposure to classic Japanese toys. I do still own a few McFarlane toys - my gateway drug for example: Zombie Spawn.

> does that mean he's a dirty word now?

To my tastes, yes - the toys his company produces are, in general, poison.

> The guy knows how to sculpt.

Lots of people know how to sculpt (which is probably why Todd hired a crew and doesn't actually do that himself) - do I have to appreciate them all?

I repeat: to each their own.

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/01/2006 02:58PM by cae.
Oh, I would never accuse you of trying to appear edgy, Corey. Heavens no.

I keep forgetting that you were just an unrefined peasant back when we met. You are a much better person now. My bad.

Jape
cae
Odd - you appear to be taking my disinterest in McFarlane toys personally. Are you a rep for them, now?

I'm sorry if you feel I am attacking you vicariously through McFarlane Toys - I can assure you that you were not in my mind when I wrote the post. Honest.

> I keep forgetting that you were just an unrefined peasant back when we met. You are a much better person now.

You seem bent on implying that I equate one's toy preferences with one's social and cultural place in society. Nothing could be farther from the truth.

Honestly, Jape, I think any adult who collects anything as meaningless as toys - and I include myself in this - had better spend some serious time looking inward before outward when it comes to figuring 'hipness' as our culture presently deems it. We're pretty low on the totem pole.

That being said, it's none of my business what you think of me. As I ever love to quote: "One man's religion is another man's belly laugh." Or, perhaps more to the point, and in the words of Don Van Vliet as the Grand Wazoo: "Fuck you if you don't like my hat."



---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/01/2006 03:31PM by cae.
Space Runaway Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> On that note, was there anyone else who thought
> the D-1 design just didn't work? I remember going
> through the sketches when they were put up on ZP
> and being really impressed until I got to
> Dragonar. I saw that one and was like, "Oh...he
> drew Dragonar."

I guess because Dragonar is something that doesn't need a modern revision. It already works as a mecha design while all the other are old 70's super robots that need pragmatic detail to look cool for those that enjoy stuff like that (like me).


Vincent Z. Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Space Runaway Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
>
> > On that note, was there anyone else who
> thought
> > the D-1 design just didn't work? I remember
> going
> > through the sketches when they were put up on
> ZP
> > and being really impressed until I got to
> > Dragonar. I saw that one and was like,
> "Oh...he
> > drew Dragonar."
>
> I guess because Dragonar is something that doesn't
> need a modern revision. It already works as a
> mecha design while all the other are old 70's
> super robots that need pragmatic detail to look
> cool for those that enjoy stuff like that (like
> me).
>
>
>

I thought the whole Power Icon Vs. War Weapon (As in, the Gundam is just a weapon) could be fairly telling here too. This is just speculation, but I'm curious whether or not he was able to be passionate about the subject, given his preference between eras.
That said, would I pick up a EX Gokin Dragonar? Damn straight I would (of course, what doesn't need to be said is that I would pick up just about any articulated rendition of Dragonar).
MattAlt (Admin)
I'm fascinated by the drama these toys seem to generate. Sato himself commented that he knows that the designs are going to polarize fans, whereas the Soul of Chogokin are designed to appeal to the widest possible base of consumers. From that standpoint, I guess you could say they're the "punk" to Bandai's "pop"!
Matt,
Wouldn't you say that happens any time a designer puts his own spin on a classic design? I mean, beyond the demands of the medium or technology (for example, tin robots--nobody complains about the simplified shapes). Or is Sato's case unique in some way?

Corey,
I think I've got about five McFarlane figures in total. I like his skills, I just don't generally care for the properties he licenses. Your comment simply reminded me of a conversation I had with my brother a couple of years ago while going through his old toys. I equate vehemence for things you used to like as a symptom of trying to reinvent yourself. At least it was for him. I guess I'm wired differently. I can't really hate anything that I used to have a taste for. If nothing else, it's got a nostalgia factor. So those kinds of comments confuse me. And I wanted to learn more.

Eh. Everybody's different. Don't read so much into this. I wanted to see why you felt that way. You answered my question. All's well.

Jape
The reason Fewture generates drama among collectors is because Fewture's figure designs go against the grain of what most people's robot collections are made of, ie SOCs and traditional or vintage designs. Even for someone who only collects Gundams or Transformers, the Fewture figures stand as being quite different. I think a lot of collector's feel threatened by designs like Fewtures because it might somehow make their collection seem obsolete.

Comparing Fewture to McFarlane's stuff seems fairly accurate to me as far as design goes. I mean you would have to be an idiot to say that McFarlane designs and sculpts are low quality. They might not be to your taste (or fit in with your SOC collection), but that's different. Yes, we all know that McFarlane is a fag and that the quality of his toys suck because the articulation is practically none (or none), and they are made of cheap plastic with no die-cast. But that aside, they are often creatively envisioned. Look at Fewture's Mazinger 1901 AD series. It's not that far from being what you would expect to see in a McFarlane figure.

When Max Factory put out GGGG I remember some people being resistant to it because it wasn't exactly SOC-ish either. Fewture is really where it's at. Not only do they offer a contemporary, stylized vision of classic characters, but since they decided to jet propel themselves into the high quality, hardcore diecast collector's market, now everyone has to sit up and take notice.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/01/2006 11:37PM by xiombarg.
cae
> I equate vehemence for things you used to like as a symptom of trying to reinvent yourself.

When I was growing up, my mom made the best toasted cheese sandwiches in the world. She took two pieces of white bread, spread margarine on one side of each, slapped a piece of no-name american cheese in between, and pan toasted them to perfection. I loved them. Couldn't get enough. They were the first thing I learned to cook on my own and I still love to make them today.

Well, sort of.

Since leaving the house I've discovered that you can make much better sandwiches using the kind of ingredients my parents couldn't afford -sourdough bread, real cheddar cheese, a few secret ingredients I discovered on my own and, well, okay, I still use margarine -but the point is, I didn't come to this by trying to "reinvent myself", it was exposure and self-education via curiosity that led me to this superior sandwich.

I might now say I hate american cheese (and I do -uck!) though I used to eat it with glee (especially on graham crackers - no, really) but if those ingredients were all I had to make a toasted cheese sandwich, I guess it wouldn't be so bad - it just wouldn't be as good as what I've come to realize FOR ME is a far superior thing, so why would I even want to buy it - or worse, dumb down what I've come to see as superior by substituting said ingredients with what I now feel to be inferior?

Project what you will onto others. No one's as simple as they appear (I hope).

> Don't read so much into this. I wanted to see why you felt that way.

The thinly veiled (?) sarcasm in your prior post belies this new found innocence. Don't blame the bees for aggression if you're the one beating the nest.

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer
The mcfarlane problem is thus: He got into action figures because he wanted to make cool toys. Somewhere along the line, he stopped that and started making fragile overdetailed plastic statues.

I used to like his toys a lot, I don't care for them anymore though.


regardless: this is off topic. I like this redesign of the getta robos. They look less like goofy clownbots and more hardened and mechanical.
cae
> the whole Power Icon Vs. War Weapon

This concept fascinated me. As a person who has approached this hobby from the toy angle alone, it never occured to me to look at the robot designs as anything other than weapons of war (can you blame me? they all gots weapons, dood!). I will never look at the Getta team the same way again.

> McFarlane is a fag

To my knowledge he's hetero.

> Look at Fewture's Mazinger 1901 AD series.

I'd rather not - they're worse than these.

> The reason Fewture generates drama among collectors is because Fewture's figure designs go against the grain

Exactly. Had I run across the Fewture Designs of the Getta team back when I remained uninitiated into the world of vintage (and vintage styled) Japanese toys, I probably would have loved them. So harsh! So cruel! So modern! They look too busy to me, now. Too heartless, too over the top. I prefer the cleaner lines and more candy-like surfaces that hearken back to a simpler imagining. I like them to look like toys.

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer
These fewture gettas infuriate me:

- I like them even though they go against everything I usually like
- They are 10" and straight-up diecast THE BOMB
- They are so pricey that I will skip them and then hate myself for missing out when they routinely go for double after-market (see CM's Star GGG)
- They make me speak in bullet points WHICH I HATE

ARGH!

(Thanks, Matt - great article)

LeMel42
Sanjeev (Admin)
My tastes happen to tend (strongly) towards Corey's...pretty much for the same reasons he's mentioned. "Goofy clownbots", indeed!

The thing is that while I'm not really feeling Fewture's Maz 1901 stuff or these Getters, I'm actually quite glad they're being made. The fact that someone's vision--as unique as this one--can reach actualization fills me with...hope? For what? I dunno...but it still makes me glad. Hey, someone's gonna love these toys. I won't. But who cares? I just won't buy 'em--no skin off my back.

But now, because of the success (or, at least, the obvious hype) of these Getters, there may be a bit better a chance of someone in the future (no pun intended) to actualize another unique vision that actually will appeal to me.


xiombarg Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> we all know that McFarlane is a fag

How...enlightened.

--
Sanjeev

'Us Massholes straight up just don't give a fuck. I still pronounce "Mazinger" as "Tranzor Z".'
-Nekrodave
Sanjeev Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> xiombarg Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > we all know that McFarlane is a fag
>
> How...enlightened.


*ahem* Pardon me, and thank you.
There is a difference between a fag and a homosexual, but good job.




Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/02/2006 02:47AM by xiombarg.
MattAlt (Admin)
I think a big part of the reason I like the EXes so much is that the SOC version really didn't appeal to me. In spite of the enhanced technology they used to make the set happen, they just felt bland and undetailed to me. (Hard to argue with the cross-combinability gimmick, though. That was great.)

I'm not a big fan of the "steampunk" aesthetic of the 1901 figures and never really paid much attention to them, but Sato's "high-definition" approach really dovetails with my robot aesthetic sensibilities (or lack thereof, depending on your viewpoint.)
cae
> A fag and a homosexual are two different things

This is true. A fag is something you throw on the fire or light, stick in your mouth, and suck on, while a homosexual is lifestyle the oafish delight in using as a derogatory euphemism.

> Sato's "high-definition" approach really dovetails with my robot aesthetic sensibilities

fag.

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer
I share a similar vibe to Matt in that the SOC Getters left me wanting. That's why I failed to pick any of them up. Although the magnetic gimmick was a letdown for me, so it hurt rather than helped them in my book. The level of detail and design tweaks on Sato's version is tempting, regardless of any gimmicks.

Ironically, I had skimmed the article and therefore didn't notice these were Fewture at all--yet the 1901 series was the main example on my mind when I asked about new spins on old characters. I like the 1901's, but I never picked them up. The first version of Aphlodai was the most interesting to me, but her price skyrocketed.

Corey,
Dude, you're being really paranoid. Chill. (That should be easy, since you've said you don't care....again....and again.....) LOL

As for Toddy, let's just say he's a.....a douche. Yeah. Didn't his brother own a shop there in WA? A lot of locals seemed to have run into him. Not a one had anything nice to say about the man himself. :-P

Jape
Matt, you should have ask why they're SO expensive. I mean half the price that they are would have been reasonable. Im guessing it's the limited appeal and production that keep each one at $250. I do love all the molded detail.

--------------------------------------------------------------

I asked if I have "Time For L-Gaim" but I got "No Reply From The Wind".
cae
Jape: 'plonk'

---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer
Vincent Z. Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Matt, you should have ask why they're SO
> expensive. I mean half the price that they are
> would have been reasonable. Im guessing it's the
> limited appeal and production that keep each one
> at $250. I do love all the molded detail.
>
> --------------------------------------------------

Everyone loves Japanese toys. It's the $250 that keeps the appeal limited ;)








Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/02/2006 01:03PM by nidaram12.
cae
> Hard to argue with the cross-combinability gimmick, though. That was great.

It's what made the two sets for me, no bones about it.





---------------------------------
hassenpfeffer



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/02/2006 05:30PM by cae.
"I think a lot of collector's feel threatened by designs like Fewtures because it might somehow make their collection seem obsolete."

xiombarg you have a point there! it threatens their status quo.and i must confess that one thing that is getting to me is hearing people say they dont like fewtures because it is not anime correct or just someones fantasy. i am sure the figure appeals to them but they won´t get it or say they like it because it isn´t very "safe" socially.
it is like when you´re in adolescence and feel divided between i like this but i should not dare going against the mainstream and be placed apart just because you have peripheral vision!
if they just said i it looks like crap then i would say: maybe!! but i still like them.


"So harsh! So cruel! So modern!They look too busy to me, now. Too heartless, too over the top. I prefer the cleaner lines and more candy-like surfaces that hearken back to a simpler imagining. I like them to look like toys."

cae that comment hit me like a punch in the stomach. they look harsh cruel and heartless and "modern".
but they still have the getter silhouete so they must have some kind of japanese toy soul left. or am i slowly starting to become a mcfarlan fan?

aarrrggggggh!

it is the skull face that does it! it should not be there. it is the skullface the starts the spiral of violence! the faceplate should not come off!! oh the horror! i will glue the faceplate on!!
i confess! i ordered it!
...well at least it is diecast...


Thanks for the story, Matt, excellent interview! As someone who was never a fan of the 70's anime, I guess i'm a lot more forgiving of the liberties taken with the character design - especially with the superb detailing and the guts to produce it in solid metal. This is something I would readily save to own... far less hesitation than, let's say, the almost always iffy output from Yamato Toys.
I'd buy this sucker if I wasn't so damn house poor! ;)

I still like my house more.
I have to admit, there are really few distinctive iterations of the getter robots that DON't appeal to me, from the stove-pipe Armageddon designs to the videogame New Getter Robo desings to original manga-superhero Go Nagai art. My opinion seems to be that the more originality I see in an icon, the more substantial it becomes, be it Getter Robo, Gundam, Batman, whatever. As part of that I try to representations on thier own merit before I compare them to related representations. In the case of the Fewture Getters and Mazinger, I find thier proportions and details appealing in thier own right, although there are other versions I find more appealing.

To put it another way, I can't help but look back to my childhood in the early 80's when I was playing with Shogun Warrior toys from the 70's and wondering why so many had to be so simplistic. Then I discovered things like Godaikin and the larger world of original Japanese toys saw that these toys could get the diversity and detail they deserved.
Anonymous User
I totally dig Sato's 'mechanical' & real-robo take on Getter. I'm only sad it still can't transform, though the design of the ships give one the impression that a 'normal' transformation can actually be achieved.

Anyway, it looks likely to be the first non-transforming diecast 'combiner' I'll buy. Most expensive new toy too (excluding SHFE Getter). I just hope I can get it below $250. Gotta Get Getta!
Fewture Getter-1 came out today, but I haven't found any pictures yet. :(

[page7.auctions.yahoo.co.jp]
Scopedog Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Fewture Getter-1 came out today, but I haven't
> found any pictures yet.
>
>


[www.actoys.net]
Anonymous User
[pony-hp3.web.infoseek.co.jp]

i did not realize this was out already
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